Helpful Tips About
Insurance and Licences Across USA
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California

Drivers License

What Do I Need to Apply?

 

True Full Name
Social Security Number (SSN)
Residency Documents
Proof of Identity

Application Process

To apply for a DL, you must complete a Driver's License and Identification Card Application and pay any licensing fees. For current licensing fees, visit www.dmv.ca.gov. You will be required to take a knowledge test, vision exam, photograph, and, if necessary, a driving test.

1.  Before Visiting a DMV Office

  • Study for the knowledge test. Study material available on the DMV website includes:
    —  California Driver Handbook (available in multiple languages and at DMV offices)
    —  California Commercial Driver Handbook
    —  Sample tests.
    —  Road sign flashcards.

  • Gather the identity, residency, and SSN documents you need to apply for a DL.

  • Effective April 2018, DMV will begin offering an electronic DL and ID application process. Applicants will have the opportunity to complete their electronic applications before visiting DMV. Be sure to bring your application confirmation with you to your office visit.

  • Make an appointment before visiting a DMV office. Appointments can be made at www.dmv.ca.gov or by calling 1-800-777-0133. You may also verify payment options available at the DMV office.

2.   When You Arrive at a DMV Office

You will need:

  • Correct fee(s) for your application.

  • Original or certified documents(s) establishing identity, birth date, true full name.

  • Original document establishing proof of SSN if applying for a REAL ID Compliant ID.

  • Residency Document.

  • Any DL or permit issued previously by any state (if applicable).

If you are under 18 years old, you may apply for a provisional permit/DL. In addition to the items above, you will need:

  • A driver education completion certificate or enrollment in an integrated driver education/driver training program.

  • Signatures by all parent(s)/guardian(s) with custody.

Note: See the Provisional Licensing (FFDL 19) Fast Facts brochure for additional information.

The DMV representative may give you a number and/or direct you to wait. When it is your turn, you will be called to a window to process your application.

3.  When You Are Called to a Representative’s Window

  • Provide all of the documents listed previously. These documents are used to verify your information and establish a DMV record.

  • The DMV representative will scan your fingerprint. This fingerprint will also be used for taking your photograph and administering tests.

  • After your information has been entered into the computer, an application fee (or any other applicable fee) will be collected.

  • The DMV representative will test your vision (ensure you bring your corrective lenses if needed), and direct you to the camera.

  • At the camera, your fingerprint will be rescanned and the representative will capture your signature and take your photograph.

Note: The signature and photograph will appear on your DL.

4.  Taking Your Knowledge Test

DMV administers knowledge tests to determine if an applicant understands the laws and rules of the road. Depending on the type of DL you apply for, more than one knowledge test may be required (for example, motorcycle or commercial DL).

  • The knowledge test may be done on the computer (TouchScreen Testing) in a variety of languages or, in certain cases, on paper or audio.

  • Once you complete the test, follow the directions provided by the DMV representative.

  • TouchScreen tests will be automatically graded. A DMV representative will grade paper and audio tests.

  • Didn’t pass? Don’t worry. You can repeat this step. Before retesting, study the California Driver Handbook or California Commercial Driver Handbook. Provisional applicants must wait 1 week before retesting.

  • If you do not pass the knowledge test after 3 attempts, you must begin the application process again.

Note: You may not drive unless you have a valid document in your possession that authorizes you to drive.

5.  What Happens Once You Pass Your Knowledge Test?

  • After you pass the knowledge test, you must return back to the window to receive your licensing document. Verify that all information printed on your licensing document is correct (for example, name and address) and sign the front of the document in the space provided before leaving the DMV representative’s window.

  • If you are issued an interim or temporary DL, you do not need a driving test.

  • If you are issued a driver's permit, read it carefully to make sure you understand the driving restrictions that apply.

Note: The provisional permit is not valid until you start the behind-the-wheel driver training class and your permit is signed by the instructor or you are 17 ½ years old.

6.  Preparing for Your Driving Test

  • Even if you have driven before, it is a good idea to practice driving before making a driving test appointment. For more information, see the Preparing for Your Driving Test (FFDL 22) Fast Facts brochure. Commercial drivers, review the requirements in the California Commercial Driver Handbook.

  • Behind-the-wheel driving tests are available by appointment only. Once you are ready, schedule an appointment at www.dmv.ca.gov or by calling 1-800-777-0133.

  • Didn’t pass? Don’t worry. You can make an appointment to repeat this step. Provisional applicants must wait 2 weeks before retesting.

  • Check the DMV website for the retest fee(s). If you do not pass the driving test after 3 attempts, you must begin the application process again.

7.  Receiving Your DL

  • After successfully completing the testing process, you may be issued an interim or temporary DL valid for up to 60 days. You may drive without an accompanying driver until your interim or temporary DL expires.

  • An interim DL is a paper DL issued to you until the permanent DL is mailed.

  • A temporary DL is a paper DL issued to you because the application is incomplete and pending additional information or requirements.

  • If you do not receive your DL card within 60 days, call 1-800-777-0133 to check the status.

Note: Review your DL and the California Driver Handbook or California Commercial Driver Handbook for driving restrictions.

https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/detail/pubs/brochures/fast_facts/ffdl05

Financial Responsibility (Insurance) Requirements for Vehicle Registration (FFVR 18)

Do I Need Financial Responsibility?

Financial responsibility (commonly known as insurance) is required on all vehicles operated or parked on California roadways.
You must carry evidence of financial responsibility in your vehicle at all times and it must
be provided as specified below when:

  • Requested by law enforcement.

  • Renewing vehicle registration.

  • The vehicle is involved in a traffic collision.

Insurance companies in California are required by law (California Vehicle Code (CVC) §16058) to electronically report private-use vehicle insurance information to the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). Insurance companies are exempt from electronically reporting insurance information for vehicles covered by commercial or business insurance policies.

Electronic reporting of insurance information and programming changes that took effect in 2006, allow DMV to monitor insurance coverage and take appropriate actions through vehicle suspension as required by law.

Law enforcement and court personnel have electronic access to insurance status on DMV records.

What Are the Minimum Liability Insurance Requirements for Private Passenger Vehicles (California Insurance Code §11580.1b)?

  • $15,000 for injury/death to one person.

  • $30,000 for injury/death to more than one person.

  • $5,000 for damage to property.

Liability insurance compensates a person other than the policyholder for personal injury or property damage. Comprehensive or collision insurance does not meet vehicle financial responsibility requirements.

What Are the Types of Financial Responsibility?

  • Motor vehicle liability insurance policy.

  • A cash deposit of $35,000 with DMV.

  • DMV-issued self-insurance certificate.

  • Surety bond for $35,000 from a company licensed to do business in California.

For information regarding cash deposits or self-insurance, contact the DMV Financial Responsibility Unit at (916) 657-6520.

To locate a company that issues surety bonds, contact the Department of Insurance at www.insurance.ca.gov or by calling 1-800-927-4357.

Is Low-Cost Insurance Available?

If you cannot afford liability insurance, you may be eligible for the California Low-Cost Automobile Insurance Program. Additional information is available at www.mylowcostauto.com or by calling 1-866-602-8861.

Will I Be Asked to Provide Evidence of Financial Responsibility?

You may be requested to submit additional insurance information to DMV, such as:

  • A document or identification card from your insurance company.

  • A DMV authorization letter, if you are a cash depositor or are self-insured.

  • California Proof of Insurance Certificate (SR-22) form for broad coverage or owner's policy.

  • Evidence that the vehicle is owned or leased by a public entity is defined in California Government Code §811.2.

  • Notification of Alternative Forms of Financial Responsibility (REG 5085) form for a vehicle covered by commercial or business policies and being registered for the first time.

  • Statement of Facts (REG 256) form certifying the motor carrier has evidence of insurance on file with the Public Utilities Commission or DMV pursuant to CVC §34630.

Must I Notify DMV Before I Cancel My Insurance?

Yes. To prevent a vehicle registration suspension, you must notify DMV before you cancel your insurance. If you are not operating your currently registered vehicle, and it is not parked on a California roadway, you may submit an Affidavit of Non-Use (ANU) (REG 5090) form to DMV online at www.dmv.ca.gov, by calling the automated voice system at 1-800-777-0133, or by mail to one of the addresses at the end of this brochure.

You may remove the ANU during the same registration year online at www.dmv.ca.gov, by calling 1-800-777-0133, or by mailing evidence of insurance to the DMV-VIP Unit at the address at the end of this brochure.

After filing the ANU, the vehicle's insurance may be canceled. However, if the vehicle is still not in use when registration renewal fees are due, you must pay renewal fees or request the vehicle be placed on planned non operation (PNO) status. You are not eligible to file an ANU once the registration expires. You can obtain additional PNO information at www.dmv.ca.gov.

When Is My Vehicle Registration Subject to Suspension (CVC §4000.38)?

Vehicle registration is suspended when:

  • DMV is notified that an insurance policy has been canceled and a replacement policy is not submitted within 45 days.

  • Insurance information is not submitted to DMV within 30 days of issuance of a registration card upon initial registration or transfer of ownership.

  • The registration is obtained by providing false evidence of insurance.

What Do I Do If My Vehicle Registration Is Suspended?

If you have received a letter from DMV stating your vehicle registration will be suspended in the near future or has already been suspended, submit your insurance information and/or reinstatement fee:

  • Online at www.dmv.ca.gov (with or without a notification letter). The Vehicle Registration Suspensions and Insurance Program pages provide up-to-date vehicle registration insurance suspension status and options to submit a reinstatement fee payment electronically, submit insurance information, submit/remove an Affidavit of Non-Use (ANU), and frequently asked questions (FAQ).

  • By mail with your notification letter. Mail the detachable stub from your notification letter, proof of liability insurance, and/or a reinstatement fee payment to:

DMV
PO Box 997405
Sacramento, CA 95899-7405

  • By mail without a notification letter. Mail proof of liability insurance and/or a reinstatement fee payment to:

DMV-VIP Unit
PO Box 997408 MS N305
Sacramento, CA 95899-7408

  • By telephone on the automated voice system at 1-800-777-0133. You may also verify your registration insurance suspension status, submit a reinstatement fee payment, submit proof of liability insurance, and submit/remove an ANU.

Note: DMV field office and call center personnel cannot process paperwork to clear vehicle registration insurance suspensions. You will be referred to one of the service options listed previously.

What Are the Consequences of Driving a Vehicle With Suspended Registration?

In addition to the vehicle registration suspension, you may:

  • Be cited.

  • Has your vehicle been impounded?

  • Be personally liable for damages, if you are involved in a collision.

 

 

 

https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/detail/pubs/brochures/fast_facts/ffvr18

Financial Responsibility (Insurance) Requirements for Vehicle Registration (FFVR 18)

Do I Need Financial Responsibility?

Financial responsibility (commonly known as insurance) is required on all vehicles operated or parked on California roadways.
You must carry evidence of financial responsibility in your vehicle at all times and it must
be provided as specified below when:

  • Requested by law enforcement.

  • Renewing vehicle registration.

  • The vehicle is involved in a traffic collision.

Insurance companies in California are required by law (California Vehicle Code (CVC) §16058) to electronically report private-use vehicle insurance information to the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). Insurance companies are exempt from electronically reporting insurance information for vehicles covered by commercial or business insurance policies.

Electronic reporting of insurance information and programming changes that took effect in 2006, allow DMV to monitor insurance coverage and take appropriate actions through vehicle suspension as required by law.

Law enforcement and court personnel have electronic access to insurance status on DMV records.

What Are the Minimum Liability Insurance Requirements for Private Passenger Vehicles (California Insurance Code §11580.1b)?

  • $15,000 for injury/death to one person.

  • $30,000 for injury/death to more than one person.

  • $5,000 for damage to property.

Liability insurance compensates a person other than the policy holder for personal injury or property damage. Comprehensive or collision insurance does not meet vehicle financial responsibility requirements.

What Are the Types of Financial Responsibility?

  • Motor vehicle liability insurance policy.

  • Cash deposit of $35,000 with DMV.

  • DMV-issued self-insurance certificate.

  • Surety bond for $35,000 from a company licensed to do business in California.

For information regarding cash deposits or self-insurance, contact the DMV Financial Responsibility Unit at (916) 657-6520.

To locate a company that issues surety bonds, contact the Department of Insurance at www.insurance.ca.gov or by calling 1-800-927-4357.

Is Low Cost Insurance Available?

If you cannot afford liability insurance, you may be eligible for the California Low Cost Automobile Insurance Program. Additional information is available at www.mylowcostauto.com or by calling 1-866-602-8861.

Will I Be Asked to Provide Evidence of Financial Responsibility?

You may be requested to submit additional insurance information to DMV, such as:

  • A document or identification card from your insurance company.

  • A DMV authorization letter, if you are a cash depositor or are self-insured.

  • California Proof of Insurance Certificate (SR-22) form for broad coverage or owner's policy.

  • Evidence that the vehicle is owned or leased by a public entity defined in California Government Code §811.2.

  • Notification of Alternative Forms of Financial Responsibility (REG 5085) form for a vehicle covered by commercial or business policies and being registered for the first time.

  • Statement of Facts (REG 256) form certifying the motor carrier has evidence of insurance on file with the Public Utilities Commission or DMV pursuant to CVC §34630.

Must I Notify DMV Before I Cancel My Insurance?

Yes. To prevent a vehicle registration suspension, you must notify DMV before you cancel your insurance. If you are not operating your currently registered vehicle, and it is not parked on a California roadway, you may submit an Affidavit of Non-Use (ANU) (REG 5090) form to DMV online at www.dmv.ca.gov, by calling the automated voice system at 1-800-777-0133, or by mail to one of the addresses at the end of this brochure.

You may remove the ANU during the same registration year online at www.dmv.ca.gov, by calling 1-800-777-0133, or by mailing evidence of insurance to the DMV-VIP Unit at the address at the end of this brochure.

After filing the ANU, the vehicle's insurance may be cancelled. However, if the vehicle is still not in use when registration renewal fees are due, you must pay renewal fees or request the vehicle be placed on planned nonoperation (PNO) status. You are not eligible to file an ANU once the registration expires. You can obtain additional PNO information at www.dmv.ca.gov.

When Is My Vehicle Registration Subject to Suspension (CVC §4000.38)?

Vehicle registration is suspended when:

  • DMV is notified that an insurance policy has been cancelled and a replacement policy is not submitted within 45 days.

  • Insurance information is not submitted to DMV within 30 days of issuance of a registration card upon initial registration or transfer of ownership.

  • The registration is obtained by providing false evidence of insurance.

What Do I Do If My Vehicle Registration Is Suspended?

If you have received a letter from DMV stating your vehicle registration will be suspended in the near future or has already been suspended, submit your insurance information and/or reinstatement fee:

  • Online at www.dmv.ca.gov (with or without a notification letter). The Vehicle Registration Suspensions and Insurance Program pages provide up-to-date vehicle registration insurance suspension status and options to submit a reinstatement fee payment electronically, submit insurance information, submit/remove an Affidavit of Non-Use (ANU), and frequently asked questions (FAQ).

  • By mail with your notification letter. Mail the detachable stub from your notification letter, proof of liability insurance, and/or a reinstatement fee payment to:

DMV
PO Box 997405
Sacramento, CA 95899-7405

  • By mail without a notification letter. Mail proof of liability insurance and/or a reinstatement fee payment to:

DMV-VIP Unit
PO Box 997408 MS N305
Sacramento, CA 95899-7408

  • By telephone on the automated voice system at 1-800-777-0133. You may also verify your registration insurance suspension status, submit a reinstatement fee payment, submit proof of liability insurance, and submit/remove an ANU.

Note: DMV field office and call center personnel cannot process paperwork to clear vehicle registration insurance suspensions. You will be referred to one of the service options listed previously.

What Are the Consequences of Driving a Vehicle With Suspended Registration?

In addition to the vehicle registration suspension, you may:

  • Be cited.

  • Have your vehicle impounded.

  • Be personally liable for damages, if you are involved in a collision.

 

 

 

https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/detail/pubs/brochures/fast_facts/ffvr18

Colorado

Adult License

 

What do I need to do before I go to the driver's license office?

 

What do I need to bring to the driver's license office?

 

New to Colorado from another country?  Click here.

 

Individuals who are unable to demonstrate lawful presence in the U.S., please visit the CO-RCSA SB13-251 information page for requirements.

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dmv/adult-license

Insurance

  • If the vehicle was titled in another state a VIN verification must be completed. Please see Titling a Vehicle.

  • Title assigned in owner's name or current out of state registration. 

  • Secure and Verifiable Identification Information

  • Proof of Colorado Vehicle Emissions (if applicable)

  • Proof Of Insurance:

    • Registration of your vehicle(s) may be denied or delayed if the Colorado Motor Vehicle Registration file does not show insurance coverage for the vehicle(s).  You must provide any of these forms of proof to your county motor vehicle office before you can register your vehicle(s). For more information, please view Rule 46. Application for Registration- Proof of Insurance.

    • Forms of Proof:

    • Colorado Insurance card

    • Copy of your Colorado insurance policy

    • A letter from your insurance company (on company letterhead)

    • Computer printout from the insurer.

    • Facsimile of the proof of insurance.

    • Electronic proof of insurance that is not otherwise available to the department. This may be, but is not limited to, the insurer providing electronic image/proof on the applicant’s cellular phone, laptop, or another portable type of electronic device.

    • If web-based services are available, the department may use the applicant’s insurer-provided web-based services for proof of insurance.

    • Electronic mail sent from the applicant’s insurer.

  • Acceptable types of insurance policies 

    • ​Vehicle Specific – Identifies the vehicle by VIN, year, make, and specifies the term of coverage.

    • Commercial – Covers a fleet of vehicles and drivers, identifies the commercial entity, and specifies the term of coverage.

    • Self-insurance – Certificate of self-insurance issued by the State Commissioner of Insurance to an owner of twenty-five or more vehicles

    • Blanket/Operator – Covers the insured driver for any vehicle driven by them, specific vehicles are not listed. Specifies the term of coverage

    • Owner/Operator Broad Form – The policy insures any or all vehicles owned by a person or business. The person or business name must show as one
      of the owners of the vehicle. This policy is not vehicle specific.

  • Affidavit of Non-Use of Vehicle

    • Colorado residents who wish to register vehicles that will not be operated for a period of time or are temporarily residing out of state with valid out of state insurance, may complete the Affidavit of Non-Use and submit it to their county motor vehicle office.

 

 

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dmv/registration-requirements

Connecticut
Drivers License

NEW PROCESS: You will not receive a permanent driver's license or ID card while at DMV.   It will arrive through the mail. For more on this, please see Central Issuance. After visiting an office, you can track the delivery of your new card.

 

NOTE: This service is offered at DMV Hub Offices only. Find a DMV Hub Office near you.

This service is provided on a walk-in basis.

Once you have established residency in Connecticut, you have 30 days to transfer your out-of-state license to Connecticut. 

 

DRIVE ONLY APPLICANTS: If you would like to apply for a Drive Only License (for undocumented individuals), please follow these instructions.


The driver must possess an out-of-state license that has not expired for more than 2 years. A vision test will be administered prior to the issuance of the Connecticut license. Bring glasses or contact lenses if needed for testing. 

 

When you are prepared to apply for a Connecticut Driver's License, please visit a DMV Hub Office.

 

You will be asked to provide the following:

Special situations:

  • If your out-of-state license has expired for more than two years, you must obtain a Learner's Permit and you will be required to take an 8-hour safe driving practices course at a Connecticut-licensed driving school before taking a skills test at a DMV office.

  • If you have lost your out-of-state license you will need to obtain a certified copy of your out-of-state driver history or abstract dated within 60 days.  The previous licensing state will be notified of the issuance of the Connecticut license, and your previous state license will be canceled. 

  • Full-time students living in Connecticut but maintaining out-of-state or out-of-country permanent residency do not have to obtain a Connecticut license as long as full-time student status is in effect. Once full-time student status is terminated (according to school records), you have 30 days to obtain a Connecticut license.

  • Military personnel and dependents stationed in Connecticut are not required to obtain a Connecticut license.  For Connecticut license holders, please see Military Personnel Renewing their Connecticut Driver's License.   

  • Foreign travelers on a visitor's visa may operate a motor vehicle in Connecticut for one year with a valid out-of-country license and an International Driver Permit which is obtained from their home country.

  • A license from American Samoa, Guam, or U.S. Virgin Islands is the same as an out-of-state license (same requirements as above); however, you must obtain an abstract of your driver record from your home territory prior to transferring your license to Connecticut. 

    The DMV will waive the requirement for an applicant to present an abstract when transferring a non-CDL license from Guam for active-duty military personnel and their family members. The applicant's military identification or the family member's dependent identification must be shown.

  • A license from Puerto Rico is the same as an out-of-state license (same requirements as above), however, the DMV office you visit will verify your Puerto Rico license with your home territory prior to transferring your Puerto Rico license to Connecticut. The DMV will notify you via mail of your Puerto Rico license status. The letter that you receive from the DMV will provide you with information on how to proceed with the licensing transaction.

  • A valid license from Canada, Germany, or France can also be transferred to Connecticut using the same procedures for an out-of-state license. 

Reminder:  As a new Connecticut resident, you are required to transfer your out-of-state registration to Connecticut within 60 days.  Please see Requirements to Transfer Your Out of State Registered Vehicle for detailed information.

 

https://www.ct.gov/dmv/cwp/view.asp?a=805&q=244776

Insurance

Once you have established residency in Connecticut, you have 60 days to transfer your vehicle registration to this state.

Here are the steps to take:

Step 1:  Emissions test or VIN check needed for your vehicle. 

If vehicle is model year 2015 and older then vehicle needs to have an emissions test done. Vehicles that are exempt from emissions testing will require a vehicle identification number (VIN) verification.  You can use your current registration to meet this requirement.

Step 2: Gather your documents prior to visiting a DMV office.

Documents required:

  • Identification.  If you are transferring your out-of-state driver’s license to Connecticut, you can do that when registering your vehicle. 

  • Proof of insurance.  Your insurance card must include this information.

  • Completed registration form (H-13B).   Download and fill out this form before coming into the office.

  • Vehicle inspection report.  This will be provided by the technician at the time of your vehicle’s emissions test or VIN verification. 

  • Payment for fees.  See estimated fee information here.

  • Proof of ownership.  An original title is required, and a leased vehicle requires an original power of attorney from the leasing company.  If you have a lien or are leasing a vehicle, you must contact your lienholder or leasing company to notify them that Connecticut requires the original vehicle title to register a vehicle.  Please notify the lien holder or leasing company using this formand ask them to mail the title to the address below:

State of Connecticut
Department of Motor Vehicles
ATTN: Record Updates
60 State Street
Wethersfield, CT 06161    

Upon confirmation of receipt of your title documents, please allow 5 business days for the vehicle to be processed into the system before visiting a branch office.

If the original title is not available, you can request a six-month registration (called a courtesy registration) to give your lienholder or leasing company time to mail your original title to Connecticut DMV. This applies only when there is a lien holder holding the original title. More information on how to apply for a courtesy registration.

Step 3: Visit the proper DMV office. 

If you are transferring your license and registration, you must visit a DMV hub office. If you are only registering your vehicle, you can visit a DMV hub or limited service office

 

https://www.ct.gov/dmv/cwp/view.asp?a=810&q=245080

Daleware
Driver Services

New Resident Transfer License (Over 18)

 

Drivers From Other States

If you move into Delaware from another State, you must apply for a Delaware driver's license within 60 days after becoming a resident. You must turn in your previously issued out-of-state driver's license or have a current certified copy of your driving record, provide proof of legal presence such as a birth certificate or passport, proof of social security number, two proofs of DE residency, and all proofs of legal name change if applicable.  If proper documentation is provided, you will be issued a federally compliant driver license.  Please refer to the "Acceptable Identification Document List" for more information.  Applicants will be required to fill out an application and pass an eye screening test. Written and road test may be given, but they are normally waived if your license is valid. Suspended and revoked licenses can not be transferred until the withdrawal action is cleared.

Drivers From Other Countries.

Non-resident drivers over the age of 16 years who have a valid driver license issued by their home country may operate motor vehicles upon the highways of this State when their license is in their immediate possession. Sixty days after the non-resident driver becomes a Delaware resident, he/she must apply for a Delaware driver license. Drivers from other countries may retain their foreign licenses. All drivers licensed in other countries and U.S. Territories must pass both the written and road test. Exception: Delaware has a reciprocity agreement with Germany, Taiwan (Republic of China) and France thereby exempting these drivers from the written and road tests."

Sample of Forms:

Driver License Instructions

https://www.dmv.de.gov/services/driver_services/drivers_license/dr_lic_trsfr_ov18.shtml

Vehicle Services

Insurance Requirements

 

All vehicles registered in the State of Delaware are required to have the minimum Delaware liability insurance coverage of $25,000/$50,000/$10,000. A valid Delaware insurance identification card is required to be in the possession of the driver or carried in the vehicle and shall be produced upon the request of a police officer or any other party involved in an accident with the insured. Insurance from other states will not be accepted to title and register vehicles in the State of Delaware.

Violators are subject to a fine of $1,500 for the first offense, $3,000 for subsequent offenses and a six-month suspension of driving privileges.

In addition, the Division of Motor Vehicles audits vehicles for insurance compliance. Failure to maintain proper insurance may result in fines and/or driver's license suspensions. License plates must be surrendered to the Division prior to canceling insurance for any reason on vehicles with active registrations. Tags will be returned at no charge if proper insurance is provided and the registration has not expired.

https://www.dmv.de.gov/services/vehicle_services/reg/ve_reg_insurance.shtml

Georgia
 

Driver's Licenses

The Department of Driver Services (DDS) helps you obtain, renew, or replace learners’ permits, ID cards, and licenses.  In Georgia, you must be at least 16 years of age (with the exception of drivers with legally blind parents) to carry a full license for everyday, non-commercial vehicles.

What You Should Know: 

  • You must renew your license every 8 years. Customers may be required to pass a vision test, knowledge exam, and road skills test.

  • You’ll pay $32 to renew your license for 8 years. You may be eligible to receive a $5.00 discount by renewing online.

  • Skip a Step and save time while visiting a Customer Service Center by completing the required form within 30 days leading up to your visit.

  • If you need to replace a lost or stolen license, you can request a new one online.

  • Schedule appointments for all road skills exams.

  • You must visit a Department of Driver Services Customer Service Center to transfer an out-of-state or out-of-country license.

FAQs: 

How do I get a driver’s license?

First, get a learner’s permit by passing a vision exam, taking a knowledge test, and paying the $10 permit fee. If you aren’t 18 yet, you must hold this learner’s permit for 1 year and 1 day before you are eligible to take the road skills exam, and you must enroll in an approved driver education program.

You can find additional requirements for new drivers on the Department of Driver Services website.

What documents do I need to present to get a driver's license or ID card?

Visit the online SecureID Checklist Wizard to find out what you’ll need to bring to a Department of Driver Services (DDS) Customer Service Center.

I’m 17, and I just got my Class D Intermediate License. Can I go anywhere at any time?

Not quite yet. Drivers with a Class D License cannot drive between midnight and 5 a.m. The law restricts who can be in your car as you are learning to drive. Learn more about the legal restrictions for teen drivers on the Department of Driver Services website.

How do I transfer my out-of-state driver’s license once I move to Georgia?

Within 30 days of moving to Georgia, you are required to visit the nearest Department of Driver Services (DDS) Customer Service Center. Bring along:

  • Your current license,

  • Proof of your Social Security number,

  • 2 proofs of Georgia residency (such as a bank statement, utility bill, or rental contract), and

  • Proof of identity (such as a birth certificate, passport, or immigration card).

Additional documents are required if you are changing your name. Visit the Department of Driver Services website to create a Custom Checklist and be sure you arrive with the necessary documents.

You’ll be required to hand over your former license, pay the license fee, and receive a temporary license. You may also register to vote. Just a few weeks later, your permanent license will arrive by mail.

How do I change my address or name on my driver’s license?

Generally, you can change your address for free either online or in-person once during your current license period. If you're within 5 months of your license expiration, however, you'll still need to pay the new license fee. Make sure your local postal office notes the address change on postal records before you go to the Customer Service Center. The Georgia Department of Driver Services uses these postal records to verify that address change.

You can change the name on your license only by visiting a Customer Service Center in person.

Within 60 days of an address or name change, you must update your driver’s license, driver's permit, or ID card.

https://georgia.gov/popular-topic/drivers-licenses

Insurance

Motor vehicle owners and lessees are required by law to maintain continuous Georgia Liability Insurance coverage on vehicles with active registrations. Driving a vehicle while the registration is suspended, revoked or canceled is a criminal offense. Additional penalties will apply if convicted of driving a vehicle with a suspended or canceled registration.

Acceptable Proof of Georgia Vehicle Liability Insurance Coverage

  • Proof of insurance, filed by your insurance company, in the Department of Revenue's database.  Coverage can be verified using DRIVES e-Services Registration and Insurance Status.

    • If your search shows insurance coverage then your coverage is on file with the state.

    • If your search shows no coverage, contact your insurance company immediately to:

      • Obtain insurance, or

      • Report that coverage is not entered in the state database.

  • The rental agreement is for a vehicle that is rented, not leased - must be carried in the rental vehicle while being driven.

  • Fleet Insurance Policy Card - must be carried in the vehicle at all times while the vehicle is being driven.

  • Bill of Sale, dated within 30 days of the date the vehicle was purchased, and a valid insurance binder page (usually the top page of an insurance policy) issued by a Georgia licensed insurer.

  • A valid Self-Insured Insurance Card and a Certificate of Self-Insurance must be carried in the vehicle at all times

    • A self-insurer is any owner who has an approved self-insurance plan on file with the Georgia Insurance and Safety Fire Commissioner's Office. This plan provides coverage, benefits, and efficient claims handling procedures equal to those provided by an automobile liability insurance company and complies with all state laws, rules, and regulations. A certificate of self-insurance information issued by the Georgia Insurance and Safety Commissioner’s Office (ICO) must also be carried to qualify as acceptable proof of insurance coverage.

  • Valid Insurance policy information card for Georgia International Registration Plan (IRP) plans must be carried in the vehicle at all times. 

    • This information care is issued in the registered owner’s name by a Georgia Licensed insurer and must display the vehicle's identification number (VIN).

Vehicle owner/lessees must provide Acceptable Proof of Insurance to:

  • Register and receive a Georgia license plate on their vehicle

  • Renew, transfer or replace their Georgia license plate

  • Legally drive or maintain an actively registered vehicle

By law, the Georgia Department of Revenue must:

  • Suspend or revoke the registration of any vehicle that does not have continuous Georgia Liability insurance coverage

  • Fine the vehicle owner/lessee $25 for any lapse of coverage while the vehicle is actively registered

  • Fine the vehicle owner/lessee up to $160 in addition to the $25 fine if the lapse of coverage fine is not paid within 30 days.

  • Refuse to renew or reinstate vehicle registration for any of the following:

    • Fines have not been paid

    • An unresolved lapse of coverage

    • The vehicle is not insured

Motor vehicle owners/lessees are required to:

  • Maintain continuous Georgia liability insurance coverage on vehicles with active registrations.

  • Immediately cancel the vehicle registration for any vehicle no longer in service using DRIVES e-Services or Form MV-18J

  • Not drive or let anyone else drive a vehicle that does not have valid vehicle registration and Georgia liability insurance coverage.

 

Acceptable Proof of Insurance

Insurance Card Requirements

Voluntarily Cancelling Registration

Loss of Insurance Coverage

 

Registration Suspension/Reinstatement

Pay Insurance Penalty

Insurer's Requirements

Questions about your Insurance/Registration Letter?

 

https://dor.georgia.gov/insurance

Illinois
 

Driver's License Application

To obtain an Illinois Driver's License you must:

  • Visit a Secretary of State facility, show required identification documents, and have your photo taken.

  • Surrender all valid out-of-state licenses, state ID cards, instruction permits, and commercial driver's licenses.

  • Pay the appropriate fee.

  • Pass the appropriate exams (vision screening, written and/or driving).

  • When all necessary requirements are completed, a temporary, secure paper driver's license, valid for 90 days, will be issued to serve as the DL/state ID for driving purposes and proof of identification until the permanent DL/state ID arrives in the mail within 15 business days.

  • For Drivers under the age of 21, please see the Graduated Driver's License page.

 

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/drivers/drivers_license/drlicid.html

Helpful Tips When Shopping For Insurance

  • Find a reliable company.  Contact the Department of Insurance to find out if a company is licensed in Illinois.  Unlicensed companies are not required to comply with state insurance laws or participate in the Insurance Guaranty Fund which protects policyholders if a company goes bankrupt.  Check a company’s complaint ratio.  Our website lists complaint information for all companies with ten or more auto insurance complaints.  Check a company’s financial stability to ensure that it can pay its claims. Refer to our fact sheet Finding a Reputable Insurance Company - Using Financial Rating Agencies for assistance.

  • Find a reliable agent.  Some companies sell through local agents and some through direct marketing or group plans.  If you wish to buy insurance from an agent, look in the yellow pages or ask people you know and respect their recommendations.  Look for a licensed agent (insurance producer) who is reliable and helpful in answering any of your questions.  You can verify an agent’s licensing status by contacting our Department or visiting the Producer Licensing Record of the Producer Information section on our website.

  • Shop carefully.  Insurance is expensive.  You should shop around for the best product at the best price.  The key to comparison-shopping is to determine what coverage you need, how much of it you need and what it will cost.  Obtain more than one estimate or quote.  Do not be rushed into buying a policy by high-pressure sales tactics.  Do not be misled by advertising or buy a policy simply because it is endorsed on television, radio, in newspapers or other advertisements by famous people.

  • Understand what you are buying.  Ask for a detailed explanation in layman’s terms.  Don’t accept calculations or examples you don’t understand.  Remember, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

  • Fill out your application completely and accurately.  It is important to give correct and complete answers when applying for insurance.  If you omit or misrepresent information, the company can void the contract.

Required Auto Insurance Coverages

  • Liability Coverage – Pays for bodily injury to another person or property damage you cause due to the negligent operation of a vehicle.  It may also pay if the accident was caused by a member of your family living with you or a person using your vehicle with your permission.  The coverage may also pay for a legal defense if you’re sued because of the accident.  Liability coverage is often split into two separate coverages:

    1. Bodily Injury (BI) – Pays for costs due to injury or death to a pedestrian(s) or person(s) in another car.  It may also cover your passengers’ injury costs as long as they aren’t members of your household.  Illinois law (625 ILCS 5/7-203) requires BI limits of at least $25,000 per person per accident and $50,000 total per accident.

    2. Property Damage (PD) – Pays for damage to another person’s car or property such as fences, buildings, utility poles, signs, and trees.  Illinois law (625 ILCS 5/7-203) requires PD liability limits of at least $20,000 per accident.

Note:  You may want to consider buying higher limits because the state minimums may not be enough to fully protect you from lawsuits.  Many vehicles today are worth more than $20,000 and medical bills for injuries could easily exceed $25,000 for one person.  If you are found negligent in an accident and the damages exceed your insurance limits, you can be sued in court for those amounts not covered by your insurance.

  • Uninsured Motorist Bodily Injury Coverage (UM) – Covers you for your bodily injury caused by a hit-and-run driver or an at-fault driver who has no auto liability insurance.  Currently, Illinois uninsured motorist bodily injury minimum limits are $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident. For additional premium, you may buy higher limits to pay for claims that exceed those amounts.

  • Underinsured Motorist Bodily Injury Insurance (UIM) – Pays the difference between your UIM limits and the liability limits of the at-fault driver, if lower than your UIM limits.  Illinois law (215 ILCS 5/143a-2) requires this type of coverage if you purchase higher limits of uninsured motorist bodily injury coverage (UM).

Other Coverages That May Be Required

  • Physical Damage – Pays for damage to your auto.  You may have to pay for part of the loss, called a deductible.  Deductibles can range from $0 to $1,000.  Illinois law doesn’t require physical damage coverage, but your lender may.  Depending on the value of your car, you may decide the cost of physical damage coverage is not worth it.  Physical damage is split into two separate coverages:

    1. Collision coverage – Pays for damage caused by an accident with another car or fixed object (such as a tree).

    2. Comprehensive coverage – Pays for damage caused from most other causes, such as theft, fire, hail, etc.

 

 

http://insurance.illinois.gov/autoInsurance/consumerAuto.html

Indiana
 

Driver's License

The State of Indiana issues new driver’s licenses at BMV branches. All applicants for new driver’s licenses must meet Indiana Real ID requirements. A Real ID issued by the Indiana BMV meets federal identification requirements. The issuance of a Real ID requires an applicant to present documents verifying identity, Social Security number, lawful status, and Indiana residency.

Persons who are not United States citizens (persons with temporary or permanent lawful status) are also required to have a Real ID and must present full documentation to be issued a new credential or to renew or amend a credential. This includes providing documents that demonstrate identity, Social Security number (or ineligibility for an SSN), lawful status, and Indiana residency. This documentation is not required when replacing a valid Real ID. Please note that the BMV does not accept Matricula Consular cards for purposes of establishing identity or residency.

Beginning Oct. 1, 2020, a Real ID-compliant driver’s license, permit, or identification card will be required to board commercial airplanes or enter certain federal facilities unless you present a Department of Homeland Security-approved document. Indiana residents who have not already made an application for a Real ID should do so during their next renewal.

 

Driver's License Types

Probationary Driver's License

If you are under the age of 21 when you obtain your Indiana driver's license, your license is considered probationary. To obtain a probationary driver's license, you must meet Indiana’s age requirements below and have held a learner's permit for 180 days (approximately six months). You may also need a co-signer for financial liability and a log of supervised driving if you are under the age of 18 years old.

Age Requirements for a Probationary Driver’s License

If you have successfully completed an approved driver's education program you must be at least 16 years and 90 days old to obtain a driver's license.

If you have not successfully completed an approved driver education program you must be at least 16 years and 270 days old to obtain a driver's license.

A probationary driver’s license cannot be renewed until after your 21st birthday. You will have 30 days after your 21st birthday to renew your driver’s license before you will be required to pay a delinquent fee.

Driver's License

If you are 21 years of age or older, your Indiana driver's license is not probationary.

Renewing or Replacing a Driver's License

You may renew or replace your driver's license online if:

  • your name and address have remained the same since the last time you received a license;

  • you are not required to take an examination;  and

  • your previous renewal transaction was completed in a license branch.

You will need to provide your name, date of birth, residential address, and Social Security number in order to renew or replace your driver's license online.

 

https://www.in.gov/bmv/2532.htm

Registration & Plates

Register a New Vehicle

If you have purchased a vehicle within the last 60 days and the title application has been submitted to the BMV, you may register your new vehicle online or at a BMV Connect kiosk. If your vehicle was purchased more than 60 days ago, you need to visit a BMV branch.

Indiana's License Plates

You may choose from a variety of license plate designs, including Indiana's standard and historic plates, plates supporting military personnel and their families, plates benefiting local schools or organizations, personalized plates, and plates for specific types of vehicles.

 

https://www.in.gov/bmv/2448.htm

Kentucky
 

National Driver Register

All states use the National Driver Register to determine if a driver's driving privilege is suspended in any other state prior to a license being issued. If a driver is suspended in another state a license will not be issued until that suspension is no longer in effect. Kentucky is a member of the Driver License Compact and the Nonresident Violator's Compact.

Out-of-State Permit Holders

  • A valid permit holder from another state must be at least 16 years of age to drive in Kentucky

  • Must be accompanied by a licensed adult at least 21 years of age

  • Driving is restricted between 12:00am (midnight) and 6:00am for those drivers who are under age 18

  • Out-of-State permit holders transferring to Kentucky must transfer their permit and be issued a Kentucky permit before applying for a Kentucky Driver's License

Requirements for Obtaining a Permit / License

  • An individual must be at least 16 years of age to apply for a permit/license

  • All new applicants must complete the required written, vision and skills tests administered by the Kentucky State Police before obtaining a permit/license

  • If the applicant is under the age of 18, a parent or legal guardian must sign the Driver's License/Identification Card application form

  • If the applicant is under the age of 18, a School Compliance Verification form from the student's school district must be presented. (reference: No Pass/No Drive Law)

What do I need to apply for a Driver's License?

Kentucky state law requires an application for a Driver's License to contain the following:

 

 

https://drive.ky.gov/driver-licensing/Pages/Drivers-License-and-ID-Card.aspx#national-driver-register

You must have insurance

An owner may not operate a vehicle in Kentucky until insurance has been obtained. An owner who fails to maintain insurance on his vehicle shall have his vehicle registration revoked according to statute. In addition, the vehicle owner as well as the vehicle driver are subject to a fine of $500.00 to $1,000.00, up to 90 days in jail, or both. All owners of motor vehicles in Kentucky are required to carry minimum liability coverage. This means liability coverage of $25,000.00 for all claims for bodily injury damages sustained by any one person and not less than $50,000.00 for all bodily injury damages sustained by all persons as a result of any one accident, as well as $25,000.00 for all property damage as a result of any one accident. Alternatively, a policy with a single limit of $60,000.00 is acceptable. In addition, the policy must provide basic reparations benefits, unless the insured vehicle is a motorcycle.

Moving to Kentucky?

KRS 186.020 states that a person who brings a motor vehicle into the Commonwealth of Kentucky shall make application for registration within fifteen (15) days in the county in which the person resides.

Regulation and Requirement

Insurance is year-round / Seasonal Vehicles / Historic Vehicles

If your vehicle has a current, active registration, you must maintain insurance on that vehicle. If you do not plan to keep your registration current, you must turn in your license plate to the County Clerk's office and can cancel your insurance without penalty.

Some owners of seasonal vehicles such as motorcycles or RVs are accustomed to dropping the insurance on these vehicles during the months they are not being driven. To avoid penalties for a lack of insurance, the owners of these vehicles must turn in their license plate to the County Clerk's office prior to cancelling their insurance policy. When it is time to put the vehicle back on the road, secure proof of insurance and present the proof to the County Clerk. At that time, the clerk's office will allow registration of the vehicle.

Much the same as seasonal vehicles, owners of vehicles with Historic license plates sometimes drop the insurance while the vehicle is not being driven, but fail to surrender the license plate to the County Clerk's office. This will cause an uninsured notice to be mailed because the Divison of Motor Vehicle Licensing has record of a registered vehicle without an insurance policy being reported each month. To avoid any penalties for a lack of insurance, turn in the license plate to the County Clerk's office prior to cancelling the insurance policy.  When the time comes to get the vehicle back on the road, present proof of insurance to the County Clerk's office and the vehicle can be registered.

Exceptions

Attending college inside OR outside Kentucky

KRS 186.430 states that a student can keep home-state registration and insurance as long as they keep a current student identification card fr om a Kentucky college, university, or technical college in their possession at all times when driving in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

If you (or your child) are attending a school outside the state of Kentucky, you should check with that state to verify that state's registration requirements.

Exemptions

Active Duty Military

Active duty military personnel are able to use out of state insurance to title and register any vehicle titled in their name here in Kentucky. When registering a vehicle, if it is recorded as a standard personal policy at the County Clerk's office rather than  a military personal policy it will cause the vehicle to be flagged as being possibly uninsured. This is due to the insurance company not being required to send the Division of Motor Vehicle Licensing a report of insured VINs each month.  The Insurance System will not find a match because Kentucky does not require active duty military insurance policies to be reported each month. If you are currently on active military duty and you receive an uninsured notice letter, show proof of your active military service (pay stub, I.D.) to the County Clerk's office to resolve the issue.

Temporarily living outside of Kentucky

If a vehicle is registered in Kentucky it must be insured by an insurance company authorized to do business in Kentucky, and you must maintain insurance on that vehicle.

 

https://drive.ky.gov/Motor-Vehicle-Licensing/Pages/Mandatory-Insurance.aspx

Louisiana
 

How to Apply for a Louisiana Driver's License

You must apply for a Louisiana driver's license in person at an OMV office. You will need to pass the vision, knowledge, and road tests, and pay the required fees. Before applying, you must complete an approved Driver's Ed or pre-licensing course.

All you need to know to get your first driver's license from the Louisiana Office of Motor Vehicles (OMV) can be found on this page.

If you are younger than 17 years old, your application procedures will be different. Follow the instructions on our Applying for New Teen License page.

 

New to Louisiana?

Just Moved?

Find all the information you need to finish your moving requirements with the DMV.

If you're new to Louisiana, you may be able to have your out-of-state driver's license transferred to the OMV. You must do this within 30 days of moving to the state.

Follow the same application procedure outlined below, but in addition, you will need to:

  • Surrender your out-of-state driver's license, present a driving record from your previous state, OR submit a clearance letter.

    • If you have a valid license you will not be required to take driver's education, the pre-licensing course, or any test except the vision test.

  • Provide proof of Louisiana auto insurance (if you have a car registered in LA).

The LA OMV may waive some of your DMV tests.

 

Types of LA Driver's Licenses

The Louisiana OMV offers various types of driver's licenses depending on what vehicle you drive:

Application procedures and fees may vary.

Eligibility Requirements

Only legal residents of Louisiana can apply for a driver's license in the state.

Before applying, you must first complete either a:

  • Driver's education course:

    • Classroom: 30 hours.

    • Behind-the-wheel instruction: 8 hours.

OR 

  • Pre-licensing course:

    • Classroom: 6 hours.

    • Behind-the-wheel instruction: 8 hours.

For more information, visit our Driver's Education in LA page.

 

Apply for a Driver's License in LA

To obtain a Louisiana driver's license, you will need to appear in person at a LA OMV office. You must:


OR

  • A Louisiana identification card or driver's license with a clear photo.

  • Provide proof of your Social Security number (SSN), such as your:

    • Social Security card.

    • Verification from the Social Security Administration (SSA).

  • Provide a proof of auto insurance on any vehicle you own. 

  • Pass the DMV tests:

    • Vision.

    • Driving.

    • Written knowledge.

  • Provide 1 document proving your residency, which include items like:

  • Have your photo taken.

  • Pay the $32.25 fee ($18.75 if you're 70 years old or older).

    • Plus a local fee of up to $6.

    • E-checks and debit/credit cards will incur additional fees.

If you wish to apply for a Real ID you will need to bring proof of:

  • identity

  • Legal status.

  • Date of birth.

  • Social security number.

  • Residence (multiple documents required).

 

Written and Driving Tests

Your knowledge exam will consist of questions based on information taken from the LA Driver's Manual. You will need to correctly answer at least 80% of the test in order to pass. If you want to ensure passing the exam on your first attempt we suggest using an online practice test from our certified partner.

Your driving test can be taken either at a LA OMV office or from a third-party testing provider. Remember to make an appointment before your visit.

If you are taking the test in your own vehicle, you must provide the following before beginning your exam:

  • Proof of insurance.

  • Safety inspection sticker.

  • Registration certificate (vehicle must have a current validation sticker).

NOTE: Third-party providers can charge an additional fee of up to $40 for the driving test..

You will be tested on your ability perform various driving maneuvers, including:

  • Parking.

  • Yielding right of way.

  • Using lanes correctly.

  • Changing lanes.

  • Backing out.

 

https://www.dmv.org/la-louisiana/apply-license.php

Auto Insurance

Whether you’re purchasing your first auto insurance policy or shopping around to ensure you are getting the best deal, chances are you already know the importance of auto insurance. It helps protect you from financial loss if you’re responsible for an accident, pays for medical bills after an accident and shields you from uninsured or underinsured motorists.

Louisiana law only requires drivers to carry minimum liability coverage on any automobile they own or risk facing costly penalties such as fines and car impoundment. Auto lenders may require additional coverages such as collision and/or comprehensive insurance.

If you are a policyholder who is not satisfied with a personal auto damage claim, you can submit a complaint form online. Our Office of Consumer Services can also assist you if you have a question about your policy.

 

 

http://www.ldi.la.gov/consumers/insurance-type/auto

Massachusetts

What you need for Apply for a passenger (Class D) learner's permit

The learner’s permit exam tests your understanding of Massachusetts motor vehicle laws and safe driving practices. A learner’s permit gives you permission to drive while you practice your driving skills and prepare for your road test.

To apply for a learner's permit, you need to:

  1. Be at least 16 years old.

  2. Decide what type of learner's permit you want – a REAL ID Massachusetts permit (valid for federal purposes) or Standard Massachusetts permit (not valid for federal purposes). Need help deciding? Try our REAL ID: Real answers tool.

    • Documents you'll need:

      • Lawful presence (1 document)

        • If your name differs on the lawful presence document, you must also provide proof of the legal name change

      • Social Security number (1 document)

      • Massachusetts residency (1 document for a Standard permit, 2 for a REAL ID permit)

  3. Start your application online

  4. Bring your required identification and completed application to an RMV Service Center

 

Learner's permit exam

Topics covered on the exam include alcohol misuse, suspensions, and JOL violations, as well as rules of the road and identifying road signs. To pass the exam, you must answer 18 questions correctly within the allotted time of 25 minutes. To prepare for the exam, study the Class D driver's manual.

Class D learner's permit exams are available in 34 languages.

All tests must be taken at an RMV Service Center and are only available on a walk-in basis. Learner's permit exams are available up until one hour before the Service Center closes. Check individual locations for times.

Parental consent

If you are under 18 years of age, you must obtain the written consent of a parent, legal guardian, Department of Children and Families, or boarding school headmaster. Written consent must be given by signing the Driver's License, Learner's Permit, or ID Card application. If the person giving consent is NOT a parent, proper documentation of authority must be shown at the time of the permit test. You will also be subject to certain restrictions until you turn 18. 

Feesfor Apply for a passenger (Class D) learner's permit

Name

Fee

Unit

Learner's Permit Application Fee

$30 each

https://www.mass.gov/how-to/apply-for-a-passenger-class-d-learners-permit

Understanding Auto Insurance

Learn more about auto insurance and the coverage you are required to carry. File a complaint against an auto insurer.

An auto insurance policy is a contract between you and an insurance company. You agree to pay the cost of the insurance policy, called a premium, and to obey the insurance company's stated rules. In return, the insurance company agrees to pay for certain expenses associated with an accident or other covered losses.

Coverages

An auto insurance policy is made up of different types of insurance coverages. While there are many types of coverages available, you are only required to have four:

  1. Bodily Injury to Others;

  2. Personal Injury Protection (PIP);

  3. Bodily Injury Caused by an Uninsured Auto; and

  4. Damage to Someone Else's Property.

  5. Optional insurance coverages such as Comprehensive and Collision are commonly purchased by consumers.

  6. Each type of insurance coverage has a limit, meaning that the insurance company will not pay more than this amount for a claim. You are required to purchase certain minimum limits for each of the required coverages. Given the high costs associated with serious accidents, most drivers buy coverage limits beyond the minimum requirements.

7.Required Coverage

Required Coverage

Required Minimum Limit

Bodily Injury to Others

$20,000 per person;

$40,000 per accident

Personal Injury Protection

$8,000 per person, per accident

Bodily Injury Caused by an Uninsured Auto

$20,000 per person;

$40,000 per accident

Damage to Someone Else's Property

$5,000 per accident

  1.  

Required Coverage

Required Minimum Limit

  1. In order to register and drive your vehicle in Massachusetts, you are required to at least purchase the auto coverages and limits shown in the table above. Your auto insurance policy must list all licensed drivers living in your household who are related to you by blood, marriage, or adoption, including drivers already covered by their own insurance policies. You should also list any person who occasionally drives your car. While the policy only requires you to list "customary" operators, insurers often interpret this term broadly, and some require that you list anyone who may use your vehicle.

  2. Typically, drivers who have their own auto insurance policies can be listed on your policy as "deferred operators” at no additional charge.  However, under Managed Competition, not all insurance companies will allow you to defer a driver who has his or her own insurance policy, and some carriers will charge you extra premium for doing so. 

  3. You can typically “exclude” any household member who does not drive your car, but in order to do so, you must submit an "exclusion form" to your insurance company. Drivers who only have a Learner's Permit are not required to be listed on your policy until they are fully licensed.

  4. If you fail to list any "customary" operator or licensed household member, your insurance company might refuse to pay your claim, even if you were driving at the time of the accident.

 

https://www.mass.gov/service-details/understanding-auto-insurance

Nebraska
 

Who­ Must­ Have­ a­ Nebraska­ License?

  • Any Nebraska resident who operates a motor vehicle on the streets and highways of Nebraska must have a license.

  • Any new resident with a valid license from another state must obtain a Nebraska license within 30 days.

When applying for your initial Class O Driver's License you must bring the following documentation to the DMV: 

  1. Proof of U.S. Citizenship or Lawful Status, containing Name and Date of Birth, and Identity.

  2. Principal Address in Nebraska (at least two documents are required).

  3. Applicants must disclose their valid social security number which can be verified through the Social Security Administration or show proof of exemption from the requirement by presenting a valid, unexpired Record of Arrival and Departure in a valid foreign passport (I-94 or I-94A).

 

See Renewals if you are renewing your Class O License.

Minimum Age

17

Testing

All applicants for a Class O license that fail three successive drive tests will not be eligible to reapply until they:

  • Show proof of successful completion of a DMV approved driver training course that includes at least six hours of classroom and six hours behind the wheel training, or

  • Have held a LPD for at least 90 days.

Individuals under 18:

Individuals over 18:

  • Who holds a Provisional Operator's Permit (POP) and waits until they are between 18-21 years of age to apply for an operator’s license, the written and drive tests will be waived. These individuals are eligible to obtain the license online or by applying at any driver licensing office.

  • Applying for a first time license, who have never held a Provisional Operator's Permit (POP) are required to take vision, written and drive tests. Written test will be waived for individuals who have been issued a learner’s permit (LPD) that is valid or expired for no more than one year.

  • If a person is unable to surrender the out-of-state License or the license is more than a year expired both written and driving tests are required. Only the written test is required when the license is less than a year expired.

Operator's License (Class O) Fees

Type of Document

Fee

Security Surcharge

Total

Valid for 5 years

$24.00

$4.50

$28.50

Valid for more than 3 years but not more than 4 years*

$19.00

$4.50

$23.50

Valid for more than 2 years but not more than 3 years*

$14.00

$4.50

$18.50

Valid for more than 1 year but not more than 2 years*

$10.00

$4.50

$14.50

Valid for 1 year or less*

$5.00

$4.50

$9.50

 

Bioptic or telescopic lens restriction:

Valid for more than 1 year but not more than 2 years

$10.00

$4.50

$14.50

Valid for 1 year or less

$5.00

$4.50

$9.50

 

Replacement

$11.00

$4.50

$15.50

Change of class, endorsement or restriction

$5.00

$4.50

$9.50

*Licenses, permits and state identification cards must be issued for a full 5 year period unless:

  • license, permit or ID card was issued to an individual who is not yet 21 years of age, but will be 21 years of age less than 5 years from the date of issuance resulting in the license, permit or ID card being valid for less than the full 5 year period;

  • license or permit has a bioptic or telescoptic restriction (renewal is required yearly);

  • CDL holder with Hazardous Material endorsement (expiration date is based on date of Security Threat Assessment);

  • the applicant is presenting a USCIS document (the expiration of the Nebraska document will be tied to the expiration date of the USCIS document);

Proof of Financial Responsibility is required on all vehicles registered in the State of Nebraska and must be carried in the vehicle at all times with the following exceptions:

  • All trailers (pulling unit insurance must provide coverage for the trailer);

  • Snowmobiles;

  • Boats;

  • Dealer-plated vehicles;

  • Campers on the back of trucks (proof is required for the truck on which the camper is placed).

Proof of Financial Responsibility is presented to the County Treasurer when application for registration is submitted.

 

 

Certificate of Insurance issued by any insurance carrier authorized to do business in Nebraska.

Must be original document issued by an insurance company authorized to do business in Nebraska. Photocopies are not acceptable. Evidence of insurance may be displayed as an electronic image on an electronic device (i.e. cell phone, tablet, laptop, etc.).

The Certificate of Insurance presented must have the following information:

  • Name of the insurance carrier;

  • Names of insured;

  • Policy number;

  • Year of vehicle;

  • Make of the vehicle;

  • "Model" of the vehicle (e.g., Ford "Mustang") and/or the last three digits of the Vehicle Identification Number;

  • Effective and expiration dates of the liability coverage.

Insurance Policy must be original document issued by an insurance company authorized to do business in Nebraska. Photocopies are not acceptable. The names on insurance policy, registration and title do not need to match. However, there must be a detailed description of the vehicle (year; make; model and minimum of the last three digits of the VIN). The Insurance Policy presented must the following information:

  • Name of the insurance carrier;

  • Names of insured;

  • Policy number;

  • Year of vehicle;

  • Make of the vehicle;

  • "Model" of the vehicle (e.g., Ford "Mustang") and/or the last three digits of the Vehicle identification Number;

  • Effective and expiration dates of the liability coverage.

https://dmv.nebraska.gov/dvr/ins-req

New Jersey
Applying for a New Driver's License in New Jersey

To legally operate a vehicle in New Jersey, you must obtain an NJ driver's license.

Whether you are a new resident, a first-time driver, or a non-U.S. citizen, the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC) requires you to complete several steps before you will be issued your driver's license.

 

New to New Jersey?

You must transfer your out-of-state driver's license within 60 days of moving to New Jersey OR before it expires (whichever occurs first).

NOTE: If you are younger than 18 years old, you may not transfer your out-of-state driver's license. The NJ MVC will require you to fulfill each requirement of the GDL program. See our page on Applying for New License (Teen Drivers) in New Jersey for more information.

To apply, you must visit your local New Jersey MVC office and:

  • Surrender your out-of-state driver's license, if you have it.

  • Pass the 6 Point ID and residency requirement.

  • Take a vision screening.

  • Pass the written and road tests if your out-of-state license is any of the following:

    • Expired.

    • A provisional license.

    • Not issued in the United States, the District of Columbia, or a U.S. territory.

  • Pay the: 

    • $24 new driver's license fee.

    • $10 transfer permit fee.

      • Add $5 for an additional motorcycle endorsement on an auto license.

Your New Jersey driver's license will be valid for 4 years.

Non-U.S. Citizens

If you are NOT a U.S. citizen, you must meet certain criteria to be eligible for a New Jersey driver's license. The New Jersey MVC will also use the Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements (SAVE) system to verify your immigration status. For specific information about driver's license requirements for non-citizens, please visit the NJ MVC website.

 

New Driver's License Eligibility Requirements

If you're younger than 21 years old, you must satisfy the requirements of the GDL young adult road process. For more information, see our Applying for a New License (Teen Drivers) in New Jersey page.

If you're 21 years old or older, you will need to complete the following steps to obtain your first new driver's license:

  • Examination permit.

  • Probationary driver's license: Eligible after holding an examination permit for 3 months.

  • Driver's license: Eligible after holding a probationary license for 1 year.

Continue reading below for information on how to apply for each of these licenses.

 

Apply for Your New NJ Driver's License

Before you can get your full driver's license, you will need to obtain your probationary driver's license.

Probationary License

You can apply for your probationary driver's license after you have held your examination permit for at least 3 months.

To apply, visit your local NJ MVC agency and:

  • Complete an Auto License Application (Form BA-208). It is ONLY found at the MVC.

  • Provide documents to meet the 6 Point ID requirement.

  • Pass the New Jersey MVC driving test.

  • Pay the probationary license fee of $10. 

With your provisional license, you will be allowed to drive unsupervised, but you MUST:

  • NOT use any handheld electronic devices, including cell phones, while driving.

  • ONLY transport passengers who are parents, legal guardians, or dependents.

    • Just 1 passenger is allowed unless a parent or guardian is present.

  • Wear your seat belt at all times.

  • Display a reflectorized decal on each license plate. The decals are $4 and are available at the MVC.

  • NOT driver from 11:01 p.m. and 5 a.m.

Full Driver's License

You can apply for your full New Jersey driver's license once you've held your probationary driver's license for at least 1 year and have practiced driving unsupervised.

To apply for your new driver's license, visit your local New Jersey MVC and:

  • Provide your provisional license.

  • Provide documents to meet the 6 Point ID requirement.

  • Pay the pro-rated upgrade fee. 

  • Complete the Auto License Application (Form BA-208). This form is ONLY found at the MVC.

  • Have your photo taken.

 

https://www.dmv.org/nj-new-jersey/apply-license.php

How to Register Your Vehicle in New Jersey

In order to register your vehicle with the NJ MVC, you'll need to be able to provide the vehicle title, proof of insurance, your Social Security number, an odometer reading, and payment for your registration fee and sales tax. If you are a new resident to the state, you'll also need to have your car inspected after you register.

Vehicles must be registered with the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC) to be legally driven on state roads and highways. Whether you are new to New Jersey or are registering a recently purchased vehicle, DMV.ORG will help you get out on the road.

If you already have a New Jersey registration and want to renew it, visit the Registration Renewal page.

 

Registering a Vehicle in New Jersey

The registration process varies based on whether you are purchasing your vehicle from a dealership or from a private individual.

You may also transfer your registration from an old vehicle to a new one, while still using the same license plates (see below).

 

Vehicles Purchased at a Dealership

The dealership will handle the titling and registration of your newly purchased vehicle, regardless of whether it is new or used. The payment of sales tax will be included in the purchase price of the vehicle.

Vehicles Purchased from a Private Individual

If you have purchased a vehicle from a private individual, you have 10 business days to register the vehicle or 

pay a $25 late fee. Fill out the back of the title with the seller, providing your signature and driver's license number. You will also need to complete the sales tax information section on the title and pay the appropriate amount.

Once you have the title prepared, go to your local MVC Agency and submit the following:

  • Vehicle title.

  • Proof of insurance, or the name of the insurance company and policy number.

  • Proof of your Social Security number.

  • New Jersey driver's license number. If you do not have a NJ driver's license, present six points worth of identification.

  • Vehicle odometer reading. You will be required to pay a $25 late fee if you fail to provide the proper odometer reading within 10 days of purchasing the vehicle.

  • Application for registration (Form BA-49).

  • Payment for the sales tax and $60 title fee ($85 if the vehicle has a lien).

  • Payment for the New Jersey vehicle registration fees (based on the age and weight of your vehicle; see the MVC’s full list of fees).

If it has been 2 years and your vehicle is ready for inspection, you must make sure to have it inspected before its expiration date. Learn more in the "NJ Vehicle Inspections" section below.

Learn more about buying a vehicle on our Title Transfers in New Jersey page.

 

 

https://www.dmv.org/nj-new-jersey/car-registration.php

New York

Get a driver license

 

New York State residents age 16 or over can apply for a New York driver license.  

 

Step 1:  Determine what license class and type you need

Class: most people get a class D - Operator (if 18 or older) or a DJ - Junior Operator (if under 18).  See instructions to get a

Type: DMV offers 3 types of licenses. Learn about Enhanced, REAL ID and Standard documents.

 

Step 2:  Get a learner permit 

Before you can get a license, you must apply for a learner permit at DMV office and take the written test. You can prepare by reading the New York State Driver's Manual and taking practice tests. 

Learn how to get a learner permit.
 

Step 3:  Practice driving and take a pre-licensing course

Once you have a learner permit, you must have supervised driving practice and you must take a pre-licensing course or a driver education course before you take your road test.  

Learn how to find a pre-licensing course and prepare for your road test
 

Step 4: Pass a road test

If you pass your test, the examiner will give you an interim license that allows you to drive. Keep the interim license with your photo learner permit until your new license arrives in the mail (in about 2 weeks). 

See how to schedule and take a road test.

 
Fees

Fees depend on what you are applying for, your age, and where you live. Use the fee chart to estimate your fee.

 

Replace, renew, restore, or exchange


Replace

See how to replace a license that was lost, stolen or destroyed.
 

Renew

See how to renew your license.


Restore

Learn how to restore your driving privilege and reapply for your license after a revocation
 

Exchange out-of-state license

If you are from another state, see how to exchange your out-of-state driver license.  If you are coming here from another country (overseas), see information about visiting or moving to New York.    

 

If you are you under 18

 

Graduated license law

If you are under age 18 or are the parent of a driver under age 18, it is very important that you understand the Graduated Driver License (GDL) Law and the restrictions on drivers under age 18.

 

Senior license before 18

If you are 17, you are eligible for a senior driver license (Class D or M) if you have a junior driver license or limited junior driver license and have completed a state-approved high school or college driver education course. To change your junior license to a senior license, bring your junior license and the Student Certificate of Completion (MV-285) that you received from your instructor to any DMV office. You must return your certificate and junior license to receive the senior license. If you do not change your junior license to a senior license, you are subject to the restrictions for junior drivers until you are age 18, even if you carry the completion certificate with you. You can also give your certificate with your junior permit to the license examiner at your road test.

 

When you turn 18

If you are not eligible for a senior license before you turn 18, you will automatically receive a senior license in the mail when you turn 18.

 

Additional information
 

Probationary period for new drivers

Once you pass your road test or restore a revoked driver license, you will have 6 month probationary period.  During this time, your license will be suspended for 60 days if you are convicted of any the following

  • speeding

  • participating in a speed contest

  • reckless driving

  • following too closely

  • use of  a mobile telephone

  • use of a portable electronic device (for example a smart phone, tablet, GPS or MP3 player)

  • any 2 other moving violations

After the suspension ends, you will have a second 6 month probation period.

If you are convicted of one of the violations above (or 2 other moving violations) during the second probation period, your license will be revoked for at least 6 months. When the revocation ends, you must serve another a 6 month probationary period.

 

Your first license is valid for 5 years

For a Class D, Class DJ, and Class E driver license, the expiration date of your learner permit becomes the expiration date of your driver license. Together the learner permit and the driver license are valid for a maximum of 5 years. When you apply for a learner permit and a driver license, you pay the fee for the length of time that the documents are valid.

For example, a learner permit that was issued to you in 2014 will be valid until your birthday in 2019. You pay the fee for a document that is valid for 5 years. If you pass your road test in 2017, your driver license will expire in 2019. Your driver license keeps the expiration date of your learner permit. When you a change from a Class DJ junior license to a Class D senior license, the date does not change.

 

Drivers from other countries

You can drive in New York State with a valid driver license from another country. You don’t need to apply for a New York State driver license unless you become a New York State resident. 1

If you choose to get a New York driver license (following the steps explained on this page), when you pass your road test, you must give your foreign driver license to the DMV road test examiner.  The local DMV office will destroy your foreign driver license after 60 days. If you plan to return to your home country and will need your foreign driver license, ask the road test examiner how to make sure that your foreign driver license is not destroyed. 

 

 

https://dmv.ny.gov/driver-license/get-driver-license

Register a vehicle

Register and title a passenger or commerical car, truck or SUV

You or your business must register and title at a DMV office any vehicle you own or lease. Registrations don’t need to be in the owner's name, or for only one person. Auto dealers can register and title vehicles, and issue plates (and charge a fee for this).


 

Step 1: Get your vehicle insured

You must register your vehicle at the DMV within 180 days of the effective date on your insurance ID card. 1

 

Step 2: Bring required documents to the DMV


What you need to register 

Complete DMV’s Document Guide to make sure you have the correct proofs of identification and other documents before you come to a DMV office.

Summary of what you need

the original title (or other proof of ownership) 2 

the current NY State Insurance ID card (auto liability insurance) 3  

the bill of sale and proof of sales tax payment / sales tax form 4

your NY State driver license, permit, non-driver ID, or other proof of identity 5

payment for fees and taxes or proof of an exemption 

a completed Vehicle Registration Application (pdf) (MV-82) 

If you register for a business or organization, also bring proof of incorporation. 6

 

For quicker service, make a reservation online before visiting offices in New York City, Westchester, Nassau, Suffolk, Rockland, Onondaga or Albany Counties. 
For all other counties, see our office locations and hours

 

Step 3: Get these documents from the DMV 

We will give (or mail within 1-2 weeks) these documents when you register

  • 1 or 2 vehicle plates (unless you transfer a registration from another vehicle registered in New York)

  • registration window sticker 

  • registration document 

  • 10-day inspection extension sticker (if you did not get the vehicle from a New York State auto dealer) 7

If applicable, we will also send you a new title certificate (within 90 days).

 

Step 4: Get your vehicle inspected

All vehicles registered in New York State must get a safety inspection at a DMV-licensed inspection station

  • every 12 months

  • when the ownership of the vehicle is transferred

Learn more about inspection requirements.

 

Fees

The fees depend on the vehicle weight and where you live. First-time registration fees normally include

  • the sales tax

  • a vehicle plate fee or registration transfer fee

  • a title certificate fee

  • (in most counties) a vehicle use tax

  • either a 1 or 2 year registration fee, depending on the type of registration

You can estimate the registration fees you will need to pay.


Payment types

We accept

  • cash

  • most credit, pinless debit or prepaid cards (American Express, Discover Card/Novus, MasterCard, VISA)

  • a personal check or a money order payable to "Commissioner of Motor Vehicles"

You can split your payment between cash and check if you need. 

North Carolina

To get a North Carolina driver license for the first time, an individual must be at least 18 years old and apply in person at an N.C. Division of Motor Vehicles driver license office.

Note: Individuals at least 18 years old may also apply first for a learner permit. Teens 15 to 17 years old must apply for a limited learner permit as a part of a graduated licensing process.

Qualified applicants must successfully complete required knowledge, road sign recognition, vision and driving tests and take the following required documents to an NCDMV driver license office.

Note: An individual's name must match the name on the documents above, otherwise they must provide a proof of name change, such as a certified marriage license or certificate, divorce decree or document from the courts or Register of Deeds.

Additional Details

License Expiration

Licenses issued to adults age 18 to 65 are valid for eight years; licenses issued to adults age 66 and over are valid for five years.

Additional Requirements & Restrictions

  • Additional requirements may apply, depending on the type of license and individual needs. 

  • An individual who does not own or drive a currently registered vehicle can still apply for a license but might be restricted to driving only fleet vehicles. To remove the restriction, they must present proof of financial liability insurance and pay a duplicate-license fee.

  • NCDMV might not license an individual who suffers from a mental or physical condition that might keep them from driving safely. A person with a disability might be issued a restricted license, provided the condition does not keep them from driving safely.

 

https://www.ncdot.gov/dmv/license-id/driver-licenses/new-drivers/Pages/default.aspx

Insurance Requirements

​All vehicles with a valid North Carolina registration are required by state law (G.S. 20-309) to have continuous liability insurance provided by a company licensed to do business in North Carolina. 

Out-of-state policies are not accepted. 

Liability insurance protects drivers and their families against injuries and property damage caused by the negligence of other drivers who might have limited, minimum or no liability insurance.

To avoid fines and fees, an individual should not cancel their insurance until they have surrendered their license plate to the N.C. Division of Motor Vehicles.

Minimum Coverage

North Carolina law (G.S. 20-279.21) also requires insurance coverage for uninsured/underinsured motorists, as well as minimum bodily injury and property damage limits. This is required for all policies, even if they exceed the minimum requirements.

Table Caption

​Requirement

​Coverage Amount

​Bodily injury (one person)

​ 
$30,000

​Bodily injury (two or more people)

​$60,000

​Property damage

​$25,000

For more information, call the Consumer Services Division of the N.C. Department of Insurance at (855) 408-1212. Select Option 3.

Penalties

North Carolina's liability insurance law is strictly enforced, and insurance companies are required to notify the N.C. Division of Motor Vehicles if liability insurance on a vehicle is canceled or coverage lapses for any reason.

NCDMV will send a liability insurance termination notification to the vehicle's registered owner, who has 10 days from the date printed on the notice to respond. Failure to respond may result in the revocation of the vehicle's license plate as well as civil penalties, late fees, interest and collections.

Table Caption

​Penalty/Fee*

​Amount

​First insurance lapse

​$50

​Second insurance lapse

​$100

​Subsequent insurance lapses

​$150

​Restoration fee

​$50

Existing Coverage

If a vehicle owner's liability insurance coverage has not actually lapsed, they should have their insurance company (which must be licensed to do business in North Carolina) submit a certificate of insurance (Form FS-1) to NCDMV by sending electronically or faxing to (919) 733-6949.

Upon receipt of the FS-1 showing continuous coverage, NCDMV will update its records and all fines will be cleared.

Call NCDMV at (919) 715-7000 to confirm that the insurance lapse has been cleared.

Failure to pay penalties could result in the vehicle’s license plate being revoked and seized by law enforcement. You may also incur additional penalties.

Stolen Plates

If the plate has been lost or stolen, you are required to complete a MVR-18A Form.

https://www.ncdot.gov/dmv/title-registration/insurance-requirements/Pages/default.aspx

Ohio

PROBATIONARY DRIVER LICENSING – UNDER AGE 18

At age 15 years and six months, an applicant may go to any driver exam station to take the knowledge and vision screening to begin the temporary permit process. Prior to testing, applicants must provide proof of:

  • Full legal name

  • Date of birth

  • Social Security number (if assigned)

Click HERE for more information about acceptable documents.

If the applicant has an Ohio identification card, it must be surrendered when a temporary instruction permit identification card (TIPIC) is issued.

Prior to obtaining a driver license the following requirements must be met:

  • Driver must complete a driver education class at a licensed driver training school, which includes 24 hours of classroom or online instruction and 8 hours of driving time.

  • Driver must complete 50 hours of driving, with at least 10 hours of night driving, in addition to the driver education requirements.

  • Driver must hold the TIPIC for at least six months.

Knowledge Test and Vision Screening

Applicants must pass both the knowledge test and vision screening to obtain a temporary instruction permit identification card (TIPIC). The knowledge test is 40 multiple-choice questions about motor vehicle regulations and traffic signs. Applicants must answer 75 percent of the questions correctly to pass.

The knowledge test is available in the following languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Japanese, Russian, Somali, and Spanish. All other languages must use an interpreter. Customers must be able to understand directions and read traffic signs printed in English.

Once the knowledge test and vision screening are passed, the applicant can proceed to a deputy registrar license agency to purchase a TIPIC within 60 days of passing the test. Applicants must provide proof of:

  • Full legal name

  • Date of birth

  • Social Security number (if assigned)

  • Ohio residency

  • Citizenship or legal presence

In addition, the applicant’s parent or guardian must present identification (driver license or ID card) to co-sign for the TIPIC.

Click HERE for more information about acceptable documents.

Test Failure

Applicants who fail the knowledge test must wait at least 24 hours before retesting. There is no limit on how many times the knowledge test can be taken.

Special Accommodations

If you have special accommodations for knowledge and/or road testing, please contact a local driver exam station.

License Restrictions

During the First 12 Months of Holding a License

May not operate a vehicle from midnight - 6 a.m. unless:

  • Accompanied by a parent or guardian

  • Driving to or from work with documentation from the employer (see form BMV 2825)

  • Driving to or from an official school-sponsored event or a religious event with appropriate documentation from the event official (see form BMV 2826)

  •  

May not operate a vehicle with more than one non-family member as a passenger unless accompanied by a parent or guardian.

Driver and all passengers must wear safety belts.

Driver may not use any mobile devices, including phones.

A conviction of a traffic offense within the first six months of having a license may result in a parent or guardian having to accompany the driver for six months or until the driver reaches age 17.

After the First 12 Months of Holding a License and Under Age 18

May not operate a vehicle from 1 - 5 a.m. unless:

  • Accompanied by a parent or guardian

  • Driving to or from work with documentation from the employer (see form BMV 2825)

  • Driving to or from an official school-sponsored event or a religious event with appropriate documentation from the event official (see form BMV 2826)

Driver and all passengers must wear safety belts.

Driver may not use any mobile devices, including phones.

Multiple traffic convictions before the driver’s 18th birthday may result in a license suspension. For alcohol-related convictions, the driver license will be suspended for at least six months (see Ohio Revised Code 4511.19).

Where Do I Go?

https://www.bmv.ohio.gov/dl-gdl.aspx

MANDATORY INSURANCE

In Ohio, it is illegal to drive any motor vehicle without insurance, and it is illegal for a vehicle owner to allow anyone else to drive his or her motor vehicle without insurance.

  • Proof of insurance must be presented at traffic stops, accident scenes and vehicle inspections.

  • Minimum insurance requirements are $25,000 for injury/death of one person, $50,000 for injury/death of two or more people, and $25,000 for property damage in an accident.

 

https://www.bmv.ohio.gov/dl-mandatory-insurance.aspx

Pennsylvania

Get a Driver's License

An initial Learner's Permit is issued to any individual, 16 years of age or older, who has never been licensed to operate a vehicle, a new resident who has never been licensed, or a new resident who has been licensed in another state but whose driver license has been expired longer than 6 months. If you are a new resident to PA, please visit our New Resident information page.

PROCESS:

STEP 1:

Acquire a Pennsylvania Driver's Manual on this website: English (PDF) or Spanish(PDF). An audio version of the manual is also available.

STEP 2:

Have a physician, physician assistant, certified registered nurse practitioner or chiropractor conduct a physical examination and complete Form DL-180 (PDF), "Non-Commercial Learner’s Permit Application."

STEP 3:

Visit a Driver License Center with:

  • The completed DL-180 (PDF)

  • The completed DL-180TD (PDF)(if under the age 18). This form must be completed by a parent, guardian, or spouse who is 18 years of age or older.

  • Proof of identity, which is listed on reverse side of DL-180 (PDF). Note: If you are changing your name, you must present original documents supporting name changes such as a marriage certificate, divorce decree or court order.

    • NOTE: Birth certificates issued by the Puerto Rico Department of Health before July 1, 2010, were invalidated under a law passed by the government of Puerto Rico to combat fraud and protect the identity and credit of all persons born in Puerto Rico. As of October 31, 2010, Pennsylvania no longer accepts as proof of identification Puerto Rico-issued birth certificates issued before July 1, 2010. New, more secure birth certificates are available online or by mail. Visit the Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration website for full instructions on applying for new certificates.

  • Two acceptable proofs of residency, listed on reverse side of DL-180 (PDF), if you are 18 years of age or older. Proof of residency is not required if you are age 16 or 17.

  • Your Social Security card.

  • As part of ongoing modernization efforts, all PennDOT’s Driver License Centers are now equipped to accept payment cards. We hope to add this customer convenience at the Riverfront Office Center Customer Counter by September 2019. All PennDOT’s Driver License Centers will still accept checks or money orders as forms of payment, but no cash. The Riverfront Office Center Customer Counter currently accepts checks, money orders, and cash. PennDOT will charge a fee of $59 or more for each check returned as uncollectible. 

STEP 4:

Take your eye screening and Knowledge Test at a PennDOT Driver License Center. Once passed, you will be issued your Initial Learner's Permit.

Note: Permit holders under the age of 18 are encouraged to schedule their exam at this time for 6 months from the date their initial permit was issued. Leading up to the date of their skills test, if the student does not feel comfortable they may reschedule their exam for a future date.

STEP 5: 

(Only applicable for permit holders under 18)

You must complete 65 hours of adult-supervised skill building. Except for a motorcycle learners permit, this requirement includes no less than ten hours of nighttime driving and five (5) hours of bad weather driving as well as 6 month waiting period.

 

Motorcycle permit holders must take the Basic Riding Clinic in place of the ten hours of nighttime driving and five (5) hours of bad weather driving. For more information on obtaining a class M license please refer to the Motorcycle Information Center.

 

STEP 6:

Schedule a road test either online or by calling 1-800-423-5542Error! Filename not specified.. Additionally, certain third-party businesses are certified by PennDOT to administer the road test for a market-driven fee. 

 

Remember:

When visiting a Driver License Center to take your road test, please be sure to bring the following items with you:

  • Your valid learner's permit

  • Parent or Guardian Certification Form DL-180C (PDF), if applicant is under 18 years of age

  • Proof of vehicle insurance

  • Proof of vehicle registration

  • Accompanying driver's valid driver's license 

PennDOT uses state-of-the-art facial recognition technology when an individual has their photo taken for their driver's license/identification card renewal.

Knowledge Test

Do you think you are ready to take your knowledge test? Please use our Locator service to find a PennDOT location near you. Be sure to bring your completed Non-Commercial Learner’s Permit Application (PDF), completed Parent and Guardian Consent form, if under the age of 18,(PDF) required proof of identification and residency, and appropriate fee. 

 

https://www.dmv.pa.gov/Driver-Services/Driver-Licensing/Pages/get-driver-license.aspx

Pennsylvania Car Insurance

Auto Insurance Coverage in PA—The Basics

Whether you've just arrived in Pennsylvania or have lived in the state all your life, fully understanding your Pennsylvania car insurance options is vital.

As a driver in Pennsylvania, your vehicle is required to have at least the minimum amounts of coverage while it is on the road.

If you are caught without auto insurance, you may be fined as much as $300, and your driver's license, registration, and license plate could be suspended for three months.

When registering a vehicle in Pennsylvania, there are a number of forms that are required by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) to have your car registered. Some of these are available only at PennDOT facilities or through tag and title professionals, so don't wait until the last minute.

If you are moving to Pennsylvania, keep in mind all new residents are required to apply for a Pennsylvania title and registration of their vehicle(s) and a Pennsylvania license within a specified amount of days of establishing residency.

Learn More About Pennsylvania Required Auto Coverage

Determining the limits on your auto insurance can be tricky, so you should speak with a licensed insurance representative. The minimum limits for Pennsylvania auto insurance are:

  • Bodily injury liability coverage: $15,000 per person, $30,000 per accident

  • Property damage liability coverage: $5,000

  • Uninsured motorist coverage: $15,000 per person, $30,000 per accident*

  • Underinsured motorist coverage: $15,000 per person, $30,000 per accident*

  • First party benefits medical payments: $5,000

*Note: In Pennsylvania you may request to reject the uninsured and underinsured motorist coverages.

Pennsylvania Teen Driving Laws

PA teen driving laws allow teens to apply for a learner's permit at age 16, and receive a restricted driver's license after six months of driving. Within that time, the teen must have at least 65 hours of supervised driving time, including 10 hours at night, and 5 hours of driving in inclement weather. The restricted license in PA also allows no more than one passenger under age 18 in the car for the first six months, and no more than three passengers afterwards. The driver also cannot operate a vehicle between 11 pm and 5 am. At age 17, all restrictions are lifted.

https://www.geico.com/information/states/pa/

South Carolina

Most driver's licenses South Carolina issues are valid for eight years.

When you apply for a license, the SCDMV will automatically check your driving history in other states. If you're moving to SC from another state, you must to turn in your old license.

When you're getting a South Carolina beginner's permit, driver's license, or identification card, for the first time, you must present originals or government-issued copies of all of the following documents:

  • Proof of Identity, US Citizenship, and Date of Birth

  • Proof of a Social Security Number

  • Two Proofs of Current, Physical SC Address

  • Proof of Legal Name Change History (if applicable)

  • Liability insurance information (not required for a beginner's permit or ID)

The United States Citizens' Checklist (SCDMV Form MV-93) outlines a complete list of accepted documents. If you're an international customer, the requirements are different.

If you're from a US Territory or Protected Territory, you must meet the same documentation requirements as any other US citizen. If your birth certificate or license must be translated, use the Translation Document (SCDMV Form DL-4030).

REAL ID

REAL ID driver's licenses and identification cards are now available. When applying for a South Carolina license, you may choose if you'd like to purchase a license that's a REAL ID with a gold star or a standard license that says "Not for Federal Identification." 

Beginning October 1, 2020, if you have a card that says "Not for Federal Identification" or does not have a gold star, you cannot use this card as your identification to board a domestic, commercial flight, enter a secure federal building, or visit a military installation.

http://www.scdmvonline.com/Driver-Services/Drivers-License

What is Auto Insurance?


All forms of insurance provide protection to consumers by covering certain risks and promising to pay for financial losses caused by these risks.

Auto insurance is one of the most used types of personal insurance. South Carolina law requires that you purchase liability and uninsured motorist coverage to drive legally in the state. Auto insurance is divided into two basic coverages: liability and physical damage.


 

Liability


Auto liability insurance policies contain three major parts under South Carolina Tort law: liability insurance for bodily injury; liability insurance for property damage; and uninsured / underinsured motorists coverage.

Bodily injury liability insurance protects you against the claims of other people who are injured in an accident for which you were at fault. South Carolina requires you to carry a minimum of $25,000 per person for bodily injury and $50,000 for all persons injured in one accident. 

Property damage liability insurance pays for any damage you cause to the property of others. This not only includes damages to other vehicles but also other property, such as buildings, walls, fences, and equipment. The minimum limit in South Carolina is $25,000 for all property damage in one accident. 

Uninsured motorists coverage protects the policyholder directly. This coverage pays if you are injured and/or your property is damaged by a hit-and-run driver or an uninsured driver. South Carolina law requires you to carry uninsured motorists coverage equal to the minimum amounts of liability coverage (25/50/25).  There is typically a $200 deductible.

Underinsured motorists coverage is similar to uninsured motorist coverage, but pays for your injuries or property damage if the at-fault driver does not have enough insurance to cover your damages or medical bills.  Auto insurers are required to offer you underinsured motorists coverage in South Carolina, but you are not required to purchase it.


 

Physical Damage


Physical damage is auto insurance coverage that insures against damage to the insured's own vehicle.  The most common types are collision coverage and comprehensive coverage.  These two coverages are optional to purchase.

Collision coverage pays for physical damage to your car as the result of your auto colliding with an object, such as a tree or another car.  In the case of an accident involving an older car or any vehicle sustaining extensive damage, the cost of repairing the car can quickly exceed a threshold of the car's actual cash value.  In this case, insurers will “total” the car and pay you the actual cash value of the car, minus the deductible, rather than repairing it.  As indicated by South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles Law 56-19-480(G), this threshold is 75% of the vehicle's actual cash value (ACV).

Comprehensive coverage pays for damage to your auto from most other causes, including fire, vandalism, flooding, theft, falling objects, and collision with animals.  Comprehensive coverage will also cover broken glass, such as damage to a windshield.  In South Carolina, auto insurers cannot impose a deductible for safety glass repairs or replacements. 

While not required by law, comprehensive and collision coverage may be required by your lender.

 

File an Insurance Complaint 


If you're having a specific problem with an insurance company, broker, agent, or adjuster, file a complaint with our Office of Consumer Services at doi.sc.gov/complaint

 

 

https://www.doi.sc.gov/588/Automobile-Insurance

Texas

          How to apply for a Texas Driver License

The Guide for First Time DL/ID Applicants (DL-100E) is designed as a visual aid to guide you through the Driver License (DL) and Identification (ID) card application process.

The Department issues driver licenses valid for up to six years to Texas residents. The Texas Driver’s Handbook is available online to help you qualify for a Texas driver license. You will need to provide proof of the following to apply for a driver license:

  1. U.S. Citizenship or, if you are not a U.S. Citizen, evidence of lawful presence

  2. Texas Residency

  3. Identity, and

  4. Social Security Number

  5. Evidence of Texas Vehicle Registration* for each vehicle you own. Registration must be current. Visit Texas DMV vehicle registration for more information. (New Residents who are surrendering an out-of-state driver license only)

  6. Proof of Insurance* for each vehicle you own

*If you do not own a vehicle, you will sign a statement affirming this.

You may download this brochure for information and this checklist to assist you in determining which documents you may have that will meet these requirements. 

Additionally, you will need to provide evidence of completion of:

  1. Impact Texas Driver (ITD) if you will be taking a driving test for the issuance of your driver license. 

  2. Driver education, if you are under 25 years of age.  (Does not apply to new residents who are 18 years of age or older and surrendering an out-of-state driver license)

Once you have gathered the necessary documents and completed the required courses, you will need to do the following:

  1. Complete the driver license application before arriving at your local office. (This form is also available at all driver license offices)

  2. Visit your local driver license office.  You may be able to get in-line before arriving.  Locate the office nearest you.

  3. Provide the following documentation to the customer service representative:

    1. Application for the issuance of a driver license.

    2. U.S. Citizenship or, if you are not a U.S. Citizen, evidence of lawful presence

    3. Texas Residency

    4. Identity, and

    5. Social Security Number

  4. Pay the application fee.

  5. Provide your thumbprint.

  6. Have your picture taken.

  7. Pass Vision Exam.

  8. Take and pass the knowledge and driving tests.  You may complete the testing requirements at the DL office or through a Third Party provider. Read about testing in other languages and driving test requirements

 

https://www.dps.texas.gov/DriverLicense/ApplyforLicense.htm

1. Vehicle Inspection and Insurance

Have your vehicle inspected. Simply take your vehicle to a certified Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) inspection station. Many mechanic shops, oil change locations and service stations are certified by DPS as inspection stations. Bring your insurance card.

In Texas, you must show you have insurance coverage for a minimum of $30,000 per injured person, up to a total of $60,000 for everyone injured in an accident, and $25,000 for property damage.

2. Registration

Next, it's time to get your vehicle registration sticker and license plates. To do this, you must visit your local county tax-assessor collector office. You will need your insurance card, proof of vehicle inspection (the Vehicle Inspection Report from the inspection station), and proof you own the vehicle, such as the registration or title from your previous state. You can also show a current foreign/military ownership document or foreign evidence of ownership. Please note that if your insurance policy was issued in another state, you will need to bring your policy in its entirety so that insurance coverage minimums may be verified.

Visit your local county tax office. You are not required to title your vehicle in Texas, but first-time registrants must fill out and complete Form 130-U.

The base registration fee in Texas is $50.75 plus $1 for TexasSure, the electronic insurance verification program and other Department of Public Safety initiatives. So, total state registration is $51.75 but counties may add other fees to this cost. The state portion of your vehicle's inspection fee will be due at this time. As a new resident, you also will pay sales tax-related fees required by the state's Comptroller of Public Accounts. Sales tax fees on a vehicle can be $90 or the difference between your previous state's sales tax and the Texas sales tax.

While at the county tax assessor-collector's office be sure to ask your customer service representative to sign you up for eReminder. We'll email you when it's time to renew, and you will have the opportunity to renew your registration online.

Note: Active duty members of the U.S. Armed Forces and non-resident, full-time students attending a Texas college or university are not required to register or title their vehicles in Texas.

 

https://txdmv.gov/motorists/new-to-texas

Virginia

Age Requirements

The minimum age for obtaining a Virginia driver's license is sixteen years and three months. To obtain a Virginia learner's permit, you must be at least fifteen years and six months.

Identification and Residency Requirements

Each time you apply for a driver's license, learner's permit, or CDL (or on each return visit until your license is issued), you must present documents proving your eligibility.

  • If you are age 19 or older, you must show one proof of identity, one proof of legal presence and two proofs of Virginia residency. Proof of your social security number (if you have been issued one) is also required; proof of your social security number is always required for a CDL or a commercial learner's permit.

  • If you are under 19 years of age, you will be required to show one proof of identity, one proof of legal presence, and two proofs of Virginia residency, along with proof of your social security number (if you have been issued one).

To determine which documents to bring to DMV when you apply, use the interactiveDocument Guide, or review the DMV publication Obtaining a Driver's License or ID Card (DMV 141) .

All documents must be originals and will be subject to verification; however, print-outs of online residency documents that are listed on Form DMV 141 are acceptable as proof of residency. Temporary documents and photocopies of documents will not be accepted. DMV will not accept a document as proof of identity, legal presence, residency or social security number when there is reason to believe it has been altered, fraudulently obtained or is fake, forged, counterfeit, or otherwise non-genuine or illegitimate.

Documents accepted by DMV as proof of identity, legal presence, Virginia residency and social security number may change without prior notice. DMV may require additional documents.

You may hold either a driver's license, or a CDL, but not both. If you hold a license of any kind, you are not eligible for an ID card.

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Additional Requirements

  • If you are from out-of-state and posses a valid driver's license, DMV may exchange your out-of-state driver's license for a Virginia driver's license if you meet the identity, legal presence, residency, and social security requirements and Virginia's driver education requirements, if applicable.

  • If you are age 18 or older and you have never held a license issued by any state, U.S. territory or foreign country, you must hold a learner's permit for a minimum of 60 days or show completion of a state approved driver training course while holding the permit.

  • If you are under age 18, you must provide proof of successful completion of a state-approved driver education program and hold a learner's permit at least nine months before you can receive a driver's license. The driver education certificate of completion is considered part of the driver's license application. Your parent, guardian or foster parent must list his or her driver's license or state-issued identification card number and sign the certificate to certify that you have driven at least 45 hours,15 of which occurred after sunset, and that the statements made and the information submitted on the certificate are true and correct. Certifying false statements can result in prosecution.

  • If you previously have been found not innocent of any offense by a juvenile and domestic relations court in Virginia or any other state, you must obtain approval to be licensed from that court or a court in the city or county where you live.

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Selective Service Registration

Generally, males under age 26 must register with the Selective Service. If you are required by federal law to register with the Selective Service, you must authorize DMV to forward your personal information to the Selective Service unless you have already registered.

If you are under age 18, your parent or guardian must sign your application authorizing the Selective Service to register you when you turn age 18.

DMV is prohibited by law from issuing any type of driver's license or ID card to an applicant who is required by federal law to register with the Selective Service but who refuses to authorize DMV to send his information to the Selective Service. If you have questions about Selective Service registration, visit the Selective Service website at www.sss.gov or call 847-688-6888 (TTY: 847-688-2567).

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Completing the Application

When applying for an original driver's license, you must complete an application for a Virginia driver's license (form DL 1P). You may complete this form before or after coming to DMV. Use your full legal name. Abbreviations and nicknames will not be accepted. For your convenience, you also may apply to register to vote or change your voter registration address when you apply for your driver's license. Additionally, you may indicate your desire to become an organ donor.

If you are under age 18, your parent, custodial parent or legal guardian must provide written consent by signing your application. A court order showing that you are an emancipated minor is acceptable in lieu of written consent.

Falsifying information on any driver's license or identification card application is a criminal offense. Altering or assisting a person with improperly or fraudulently obtaining a driver's license, learner's permit, CDL, commercial learner's permit or ID card are also criminal offenses.

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Duration of License

Normally, your Virginia driver's license is valid for eight years and expires on your birthday. Your first driver's license will expire on your birthday in the eighth year of license validity.

If you are age 75 or older, your driver’s license will be valid for five years.

The Code of Virginia mandates that persons required to register as a sex offender pursuant to Chapter 9 of Title 9.1 renew their driver's licenses every 5 years.

For many individuals authorized to be in the U.S. temporarily, a driver's license will be valid only for the amount of time that you are legally permitted to stay in the U.S.. You will not be eligible to receive a limited duration driver's license if your authorized stay in the U.S. is less than 30 days from the date of your application. The expiration of the driver's license will be the same as the expiration date shown on the document used to prove legal presence. If there is no definite end to your stay, the license will be valid for one year.

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Fee

The cost of a license varies, so refer to the DMV Fee Chart for details.

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Testing

Tests may include a vision screening, a two-part knowledge exam and a road skills test. A DMV representative will tell you which tests you need to take.

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Receiving Your License

DMV will assign you a customer number which will display on your driver's license, learner's permit, CDL, or commercial learner's permit. If you wish to change your DMV-assigned number in the future, you may be required to present documentation from law enforcement or the courts indicating that you may be a victim of identity theft.

Once you pass your required testing, your driver's license will be mailed to the address in DMV's records. DMV has converted to a new secure process for issuing driver's licenses and ID cards, and has discontinued issuing them over the counter. The U.S. Postal Service will not forward driver's licenses, so make sure that DMV has your current, correct address on record. If you have moved, notify DMV right away.

If you are under age 18, your driver's license will be sent to the judge of your local juvenile and domestic relations court. The court will notify you by mail about when and where you and your parent, custodial parent or legal guardian must appear to receive your license. If you are age 18 on the date of your court licensing ceremony, your parent, custodial parent or legal guardian does not need to accompany you.

DMV can deny or suspend driving privileges for persons under age 18 if the juvenile meets one or more of the conditions below. Questions about this law may be directed to DMV.

  • The juvenile is found delinquent by a court,

  • The juvenile is in need of supervision,

  • The juvenile is involved in an alcohol or drug-related offense, or

  • The juvenile needs court-assigned services or programs such as counseling.

DMV may refuse to issue a driver's license or identification card to any applicant who appears for photographing in a disguise or intentionally distorts their face to alter their appearance.

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Driver's License Classifications

If you were issued a standard driver’s license (non-commercial) on or after July 1, 2016, your driver’s license will display “D” under the “Class” heading. The back of your driver’s license will decode the classification of “D” as an “Operator DL”. A Class “D” driver’s license allows you to operate passenger cars.

If you were issued a standard driver’s license (non-commercial) before July 1, 2016, your driver’s license will display “NONE” under the “Class” heading. A driver’s license displaying a classification of “NONE” allows you to operate passenger cars and will remain valid until expiration. Although not required, if you wish to update your driver’s license to reflect the new “D” classification, you must apply for a driver’s license replacement and pay the appropriate issuance fee.

 

https://www.dmv.virginia.gov/drivers/#applying.asp

To purchase license plates or decals, you must certify that the vehicle is covered by the minimum insurance requirements or pay the Uninsured Motor Vehicle Fee. Insurance requirements also apply to antique motor vehicles. Your insurance carrier must be authorized to conduct business in Virginia.

Virginia requires the following minimum coverage:

  • Bodily injury/death of one person $25,000

  • Bodily injury/death of two or more persons $50,000

  • Property damage $20,000

Insurance companies may factor in their policy premium the driving record of any individual of driving age that resides within an insured's household. If you have any questions regarding the potential impact a newly licensed driver may have on your policy, you may wish to contact your insurance agent.

The $500 Uninsured Motor Vehicle (UMV) fee, which is paid to the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV), does not provide any insurance; it only allows you to drive an uninsured vehicle at your own risk. It expires with your registration and must be paid at renewal. If you are driving an uninsured vehicle and are involved in an accident, the other driver may notify DMV that your vehicle is uninsured as part of reporting the accident to DMV.

Self-insurance or Surety Bonds are special options for owners of business vehicles. Details are available at any DMV office.

Monitoring and Verification of Insurance Coverage

In partnership with the insurance industry, the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV)administers a program to electronically verify the automobile liability insurance on Virginia registered vehicles. If no no insurance is found for a particular motor vehicle, the owner is required to furnish policy information to DMV for verification. For more information, refer to Verification of Insurance Coverage.

Carrying Proof of Insurance

Drivers should keep proof of insurance in their vehicle at all times.

Penalties

Severe penalties are imposed for not complying with insurance requirements. If liability insurance coverage on a vehicle terminates or cancels during the registration period, you must reinsure the vehicle, pay the uninsured motor vehicle fee, temporarily deactivate your license plates, or permanently surrender the license plates to DMV.

Vehicle owners who are uninsured or have not paid the UMV fee will have their driving and vehicle registration privileges suspended. To be reinstated, they must pay a $500 statutory fee, file a Financial Responsibility Insurance Certificate (SR-22) with DMV for three years, and pay a reinstatement fee, if applicable.

Eligible vehicle owners may enter into a Payment Plan Program to pay the statutory fee over time.

 

 

https://www.dmv.virginia.gov/vehicles/#insurance.asp

Washington, DC

Driver Licenses

If you have lived in the District of Columbia for 30 days or more and you drive a vehicle in public, you must get a driver license from DC DMV—unless you are a student, diplomat, active military member, part-time resident, member of Congress, or presidential appointee and are thus eligible for driving privilege reciprocity with your home state or jurisdiction.

The types of documents you are required to provide DC DMV depend on the type of driver license you are seeking to obtain. To learn what documents you need to successfully complete your transaction, use DC DMV's online Document Verification Guide by clicking the link below:

Driver License

Effective May 1, 2014, the District of Columbia will begin issuing a REAL ID Driver License and a Limited Purpose Driver License.

The REAL ID driver license requires a one-time revalidation of source documents when applying for or renewing your DC driver license. This evaluation will enable the DC Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) to ensure your identity and issue a federally compliant REAL ID driver license. The new requirements will affect what you will need to bring to the DC DMV office when applying for or renewing your driver license or identification card. First time DC applicants and existing DC driver license holders should expect to provide source documents as proof of identity (full legal name and date of birth), social security number, lawful presence in the United States, and current residence in the District of Columbia when applying for a DC REAL ID driver license.

The Limited Purpose driver license also requires a one-time validation of source documents when applying for your DC Limited Purpose driver license. The driver knowledge and road tests will be required for all applicants applying for the Limited Purpose driver license.  First time DC applicants must be a resident of the District of Columbia for at least 6 months. Applicants must have never been issued a social security number; or previously issued a social security number but no longer eligible; or not eligible for a social security number. The Limited Purpose driver license may not be used for federal purposes. You must schedule an appointment to obtain a Limited Purpose driver license. Prior to your DMV appointment, be sure to study and review the Driver Manual.

Commercial Driver License

It is valid for 8 years and can be renewed.

Driving a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) requires a higher level of knowledge, experience, skills, and physical abilities than driving a car or other non-commercial vehicle. To get a DC DMV CDL, you must pass both skills and knowledge testing geared to these higher standards. Additionally, as a DC DMV CDL holder, you will be held to a higher standard when you operate ANY type of motor vehicle on public roads. It is valid for 8 years and can be renewed.

DC DMV groups types of CMVs and provides a DC DMV CDL for these classes of CMV with additional endorsements and restrictions for specific types of vehicles. Information on CMV groups and the corresponding CDL class and endorsements is available at the link below:

To get a DC DMV CDL, you must:

  • Have a valid non-commercial driver license (NCDL)

  • Meet identity, residency, and good driving history eligibility qualifications

  • Take the applicable CDL knowledge tests

  • Get a CDL learner permit

  • Pass the CDL road skills test

 

  •  

If you get a REAL ID driver license, you will be able to designate certain options regarding voting, organ donation, Selective Service eligibility, veteran status and special designation indicators such as Autism, Visually Impaired, Hearing Impaired, and Intellectual Disability. If you get a Limited Purpose driver license, you will be able to make a designation on your license regarding organ donation as well as the special designation indicators. More information on these designations is available at the link below:

 

https://dmv.dc.gov/es/service/driver-licenses

Vehicle Insurance
The District of Columbia’s Compulsory/No-Fault Motor Vehicle Insurance Act requires every person applying for vehicle registration or a reciprocity sticker in the District to have valid DC vehicle insurance. You must maintain your vehicle insurance as long as your vehicle is registered. If you no longer have or intend to drive your vehicle, do not cancel your vehicle insurance until you return your vehicle tags to DC DMV. If you let your vehicle insurance lapse, you will be fined. If you have an insurance fine, you may be able to pay through a payment plan. To learn about an insurance lapse fee payment plan, click on the link below: 
                       Obtain a Payment Plan

While you have and drive your vehicle, you must maintain minimum, continuous, insurance liability coverage. The required minimums are shown in the table below:
Coverage    Minimum
Property Damage Liability    $10,000
Third Party Liability    $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident
Uninsured Motorist Bodily Injury    $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident
Uninsured Motorist Property Damage    $5,000 subject to $200 deductible


You must show valid proof of DC insurance to register a vehicle or renew a vehicle registration. If your vehicle insurance coverage is terminated for any reason, you must return or surrender your vehicle tags and registration to DC DMV immediately. Failure to surrender tags after termination or cancellation of insurance will result in the assessment of fines and penalties. More information on surrendering vehicle tags to DC DMV is available at the link below:

             Surrender Tags

Insurance companies are required to notify DC DMV of any insurance cancellations or terminations. When this notification occurs, DC DMV sends the vehicle owner an insurance verification notice to allow the owner to provide proof of insurance, such as coverage with a different insurer.
If you fail to maintain continuous, valid insurance on a vehicle registered in the District, your DC DMV vehicle registration or reciprocity sticker will be suspended. You will be assessed fines that will increase over time. You can pay any fines at a DC DMV service center. More information on DC DMV service centers is available at the link below:
•    DC DMV Service Centers
In the case of an accident, please file an accident report with the Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) and notify your insurance company. Do not report the accident to DC DMV.
Additional information available at the links below:
•    Proof of Insurance
•    Insurance Records for Accidents


https://dmv.dc.gov/service/vehicle-insurance

 

West Virginia

Who Must Be Licensed?

If you live in West Virginia and want to drive a motor vehicle on the public roads, you must have a West Virginia driver's license, unless you are exempt. You must carry your license with you when you drive.

Who is Exempt?

  • Any person operating a motor vehicle in the armed services of the United States in the performance of official duties.

  • A nonresident who is at least 16 years old and has a valid driver's license from another state or country (limited to 90 days in a calendar year).

  • A nonresident who is attending a West Virginia college or university and has a valid license from another state

Who Must Be Tested?

  • Individuals with Instruction Permits

  • Individuals from other States if Driver's License is expired

  • West Virginia residents whose license have been expired for more than 6 months

  • Individuals who have obtained a WV Identification Card

Where to Apply?

All types of instruction permits and driving licenses may be obtained at one of the Division of Motor Vehicles Regional Offices or any Division of Motor Vehicles Exam Centers on a rotating schedule. Click here for a list of locations with directions and information.

The WVDMV will make all reasonable modifications to policies and programs to ensure that people with disabilities have an equal opportunity to enjoy all of its programs, services, and activities. For example, individuals with service animals are welcomed in the WVDMV offices, even where pets are generally prohibited.

Persons who require special assistance with sign language interpreters, hearing equipment, or visual aids or anyone who requires an auxiliary aid or service for effective communication, or a modification of policies or procedures to participate in a program, service, or activity of the WVDMV should contact us as soon as possible but no later than 48 hours before the scheduled event.

Who Can Be Denied a License?

  • Any person who is a habitual user of alcoholic beverages or is addicted to the use of narcotic drugs.

  • Any person whose license has been suspended or revoked by this state or any other state or foreign jurisdiction, until the expiration of the suspension or revocation period.

  • Any person who the Commissioner of Division of Motor Vehicles has good cause to believe would be hazardous to the public safety or welfare when operating a motor vehicle.

  • Any person who is under 18 years of age and not enrolled in or graduated from an approved educational institution.

  • A person illegal in the U.S.

  • Any person who cannot provide the required documentation as outlined in the following section.

All types of instruction permits and driver's licenses may be obtained at most of the DMV Regional Offices.

To obtain a birth certificate, if you were born in West Virginia, contact the Office of Vital Statistics. If you were born in another state, the National Center for Health Statistics has information on how to obtain a birth certificate.

 

https://transportation.wv.gov/DMV/Drivers/Pages/Drivers-Licenses.aspx

West Vırgınıa Mınımum Insurance Requırements

West Virginia state law requires you to carry a minimum amount of car insurance. Failure to do so can result in severe penalties that may include monetary fines. West Virginia has a tort system, which means that if you are found to be at fault in a car accident, you can be sued for actual damages (expenses associated with property damage and medical costs), economic damages (lost wages and earning capacity) and emotional and physical pain and suffering.

The bare minimum car insurance requirement for West Virginia drivers is:

  • $20,000 bodily injury per person per accident

  • $40,000 bodily injury for all persons per accident

  • $10,000 property damage liability

  • $20,000/$40,000 uninsured motorist bodily injury

  • $10,000 uninsured motorist property damage

  • $20,000/$40,000 underinsured motorist bodily injury

Underinsured coverage can be rejected in writing if you prefer not to purchase it. West Virginia does not require you to carry additional coverage such as Collision and Comprehensive. However, if you own property or other valuable assets, supplementing the minimum requirements can help you protect yourself from monetary loss.

Penaltıes For Faılure To Carry West Virginia Auto Insurance

West Virginia requires you to carry minimum liability insurance or proof of financial responsibility and provide proof if a law enforcement officer asks to see it. Failure to do so can involve severe penalties. A first offense can carry fines between $200 and $5,000, plus a 30-day suspension of your driver’s license and revocation of your registration. Second offenses carry the same penalties plus the potential of 15 days to 1 year in jail. If your license is suspended there is $50 reinstatement fee. If your registration is suspended, there is $100 reinstatement fee.

Filing false or fraudulent insurance information will result in a mandatory 90-day suspension of your license, a maximum $1,000 fine, up to 1 year in jail and impounding of your vehicle.

West Virginia has an Electronic Insurance Verification Program that allows instant real-time online verification of insurance status during traffic stops and when registering vehicles. In addition, the state routinely conducts monthly registration checks on all vehicles.

Wisconsin

The interactive driver licensing guide is a helpful tool for those looking for information on driver licensing requirements. The guide will provide you with a checklist of requirements, and allow you to pre-fill any required application(s). Depending on your eligibility you may also be able to use the guide to electronically submit your application and schedule an appointment with the DMV for expedited service.

Note: Driver licenses and IDs are now mailed to your home. See Mailing Wisconsin driver licenses and ID cards​ ("central issuance") for more information.​

It's necessary to meet the licensing requirements​. Complete Wisconsin Driver License application MV3001 including:

  • Your Social security number (SSN) - if you have one.

  • If you are under age 18, complete the section of the application for applicants under age 18 (applicant, school and sponsorship certifications).

  • Answer the medical questions. For some medical conditions, you will be asked to have your doctor provide medical information.

  • If you are applying for a commercial driver license, complete the section of the application for commercial driver applicants.

Note: Carefully read the instructions at the top of the application for information about which sections you need to complete for the type of license for which you are applying.

Note: Hospital birth certificates or baptismal certificates are not acceptable. Get a copy of your birth certificate at your Register of Deeds or city health office.

See more information on acceptable identification documents.

Pass the knowledgevision, and driving skills tests:

  • New Wisconsin residents with an out-of-state driver license (which is valid or expired less than 8 years) may be able to get a Wisconsin license without taking the knowledge or driving skills tests.

  • CDL license holders with a hazardous materials (H) endorsement must pass the hazardous materials knowledge test and may require fingerprinting​.

  • CDL license holders with a school bus (S) endorsement must pass the school bus knowledge test, the pre-trip and a driving skills test.

If you apply for a Wisconsin driver license and have an OWI-type conviction in another state, you will need to provide proof that you have undergone an assessment and completed an alcohol program. This law applies even if you have met all the requirements in the state where you were convicted of OWI.

For further information about license examinations, identification documents and current fees, ask at your localDMV customer service center. DMV customer service centers accept cash, checks, debit cards and the following credit cards: Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover. For online transactions, we accept most credit and debit cards and ACH (Automated Clearing House) from your checking or savings account.

 

https://wisconsindot.gov/Pages/dmv/license-drvs/how-to-apply/get-lic.aspx

Liability insurance

Minimum liability coverage amounts are:

  • $10,000 for property damage

  • $25,000 for the injury or death of one person

  • $50,000 for the injury or death of more than one person

​Proof of insurance

Drivers and owners of motor vehicles are required to show proof of insurance at traffic stops/accidents if​ requested by law enforcement. Proof is not necessary for trailers or semi-trailers.

  • Operating a motor vehicle without insurance may result in a fine of up to $500.

  • Drivers and owners who fail to show proof of insurance at the time of the stop/accident may be fined up to $10.

  • Offering proof of insurance that is found to be fraudulent may result in a fine of up to $5,000.

There is no requirement that you provide proof of insurance when you obtain your driver license or are registering a vehicle, unless that information is requested by DMV and is a requirement before reinstatement of a driver license after a suspension or revocation.

 

If you have additional questions about the minimum amounts required, please contact your insurance agent or the Office of the Commissioner of Insurance​. ​

https://wisconsindot.gov/Pages/dmv/license-drvs/rcd-crsh-rpt/Auto-insurance.aspx

Contact

For all your questions and queries please contact us.